tetracycline

(redirected from Tetracyclin)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Tetracyclin: Tetracycline antibiotics

tet·ra·cy·cline

 (tĕt′rə-sī′klēn′, -klĭn)
n.
1. A yellow crystalline compound, C22H24N2O8, synthesized or derived from certain microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces and used as a broad-spectrum antibiotic.
2. An antibiotic, such as chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline, having the same basic structure.

tetracycline

(ˌtɛtrəˈsaɪklaɪn; -klɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) an antibiotic synthesized from chlortetracycline or derived from the bacterium Streptomyces viridifaciens: used in treating rickettsial infections and various bacterial infections. Formula: C22H24N2O8
[C20: from tetra- + cycl(ic) + -ine2]

tet•ra•cy•cline

(ˌtɛ trəˈsaɪ klin, -klɪn)

n.
an antibiotic, C22H24H2O8, derived from a streptomyces, used in medicine to treat a broad variety of infections.
[1952; tetracycl(ic) having four fused hydrocarbon rings]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tetracycline - an antibiotic (trade name Achromycin) derived from microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces and used broadly to treat infectionstetracycline - an antibiotic (trade name Achromycin) derived from microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces and used broadly to treat infections
antibacterial, antibacterial drug, bactericide - any drug that destroys bacteria or inhibits their growth
Declomycin, demeclocycline hydrochloride - tetracycline antibacterial (trade name Declomycin) effective in the treatment of some bacterial and rickettsial and other infections
Minocin, minocycline - tetracycline antibiotic (trade name Minocin) used to treat a variety of bacterial and rickettsial infections
Translations

tet·ra·cy·cline

n. tetraciclina, antibiótico de espectro amplio usado para combatir microorganismos gram-positivos y gram-negativos, ricketsia y cierta variedad de virus.

tetracycline

n tetraciclina
References in periodicals archive ?
Tetracyclin and chloramphenicol efficacy against selected biofilm forming bacteria.
5 the Shigella flexneri isolates were resistant to Amikacin, Amoxicillin and Tobramycin, Nalidixic acid, Cefepime, Ciprofloxacin and Tetracyclin, respectively (Figure1).
hydrophila to different standard antibiotics including Streptomycin (10[micro]g), Chloramphenicol (30 [micro]g) and Ampicillin sulbactam (20 [micro]g), Tetracyclin (30 [micro]g) and Amoxixicillin (10 [micro]g) was tested.
047 Vancomycin >32 >256 ND Teicoplanin >32 >256 ND Daptomycine >256 >256 ND Linezolid >256 >256 ND Fusidic acid >32 ND ND Tetracyclin ND ND ND Minocyclin 1 ND ND Tigecyclin 0.
aeruginosa isolates were sensitive to ofloxacin, amikacin, meropenem, pieracillin/tazobactam and polymixin B, while sensitivity to ceftazidime, gentamycin and tetracyclin was 75%, 50% and 0% respectively.
CONS found to be 100% sensitive to vancomycin, tetracyclin, linezolid and 100% resistant to erythromycin.
Blank disc impregnated with DMSO was used as negative control and Tetracyclin was taken as positive control.
07 (4, 7, 29, 35) Tetracyclin 224 100 (7, 35) Minocycline 39 100 (7) Linazolid 85 100 (29) Chloramphenicol 185 100 (35) Fusidic Acid 39 0 (7) Table 5.
The following antibiotics were tested: benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamycin, levofloxacin, linezolid, moxifloxacin, nitrofurantoin, oxacillin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, rifampicin, streptomycin, tetracyclin, tigecycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin.
The results indicated that resistance rate of antibiotics was in the range of 95% Penicillin (PEN), 82% Amoxicillin (AMO), 77% Cefazolin (CEF), 59% Ceftriaxone (CEFT) and Tetracyclin (TET), 46% Gentamicin (GEN), 32% Nitrofurantoin (NIT), 27% Cefoxitin (CEFX and Ofloxacin (OFL), 23% Streptomycin (STR), 19% Chloramfenicol (CHL) and 9% Meropenem (MER).
And the rise of drug-resistant bacteria is not only fostered by the direct use, or misuse, of antibiotics in hospitals or for individual therapy; nowadays, bacteria also mutate in animal environments through the widespread practice of adding penicillin and tetracyclin to animal feed to improve the growth rate of healthy animals, to reduce the amount of feed used in their diet, for animal treatment during illness, and to curb recurrent infectious outbreaks caused by livestock living in cramped and unsanitary situations.
And the rise of drug-resistant bacteria is not long fostered just by direct use, or misuse, of antibiotics in hospitals or for individual therapy; nowadays, bacteria mutate also in animal environments through the widespread practice of adding penicillin and tetracyclin into animal feed to improve the growth rate of healthy animals, to reduce the amount of feed used in their diet, for animal treatment during illness, and to curb recurrent infectious outbreaks caused by livestock living in cramped and unsanitary living situations.