Thames


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Related to Thames: themes

Thames

 (tĕmz)
1. A river of southern England flowing about 340 km (210 mi) eastward to a wide estuary on the North Sea. Navigable for large ships as far as London, it is the principal commercial waterway of the country. In its upper course above Oxford it is often called Isis.
2. A river, about 260 km (160 mi) long, of southeast Ontario, Canada, flowing southwest to Lake St. Clair. In the War of 1812 Gen. William Henry Harrison defeated British and Native American forces in the Battle of the Thames (October 5, 1813).
Word History: The Roman name for the River Thames was Tamēsa or Tamēsis, and this name doubtless has its origins in the Celtic languages originally spoken in Great Britain, languages that were later widely replaced by Old English after the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons. The first mention of the Thames in the surviving literature of Old English occurs in a work from around 893, an abridged translation of the work of the late Roman historian Paulus Orosius. This translation is traditionally attributed to Alfred the Great, who translated many classics from Latin himself, but it was probably made by others as part of the ambitious program of translations that the king organized in order to further the spread of knowledge in his realm. In Alfred's time, the Old English name of the river was spelled Temese or Temes. The spellings of the name of the river with an h, such as Thamyse and Thames, are much later and first begin to appear in the early 1500s. Such spellings are examples of the kind of "learned" respelling that went on in English from the late Renaissance through the Enlightenment, when the prestige of Latin and Greek prompted scholars to "correct" the form of many English words. The a in Thames is etymologically correct, since the Latin forms had that vowel, but the h is a "learned" error, added in the mistaken belief that Thames derived from a Greek word, such as the name of a Greek river called the Thyamis. Such errors were common, and many words that had nothing to do with Greek were respelled to make them look Greek. In many cases, the pronunciations of these words changed accordingly, yielding what linguists call a spelling pronunciation; for example, author, from Latin auctor and not from a Greek word, is now pronounced with a (th), even though we would strictly expect it to be pronounced with a (t) instead. The pronunciation of Thames remained unchanged, however, providing an etymologically explicable example of the notorious discrepancy between English spelling and pronunciation.

Thames

n
1. (Placename) a river in S England, rising in the Cotswolds in several headstreams and flowing generally east through London to the North Sea by a large estuary. Length: 346 km (215 miles). Ancient name: Tamesis
2. (Placename) a river in SE Canada, in Ontario, flowing south to London, then southwest to Lake St Clair. Length: 217 km (135 miles)

Thames

(tɛmz; for 3 also θeɪmz, teɪmz)

n.
1. a river in S England, flowing E through London to the North Sea. 209 mi. (336 km) long.
2. a river in SE Canada, in Ontario province, flowing SW to Lake St. Clair. 160 mi. (260 km) long.
3. an estuary in SE Connecticut, flowing S past New London to Long Island Sound. 15 mi. (24 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thames - the longest river in EnglandThames - the longest river in England; flows eastward through London to the North Sea
England - a division of the United Kingdom
Translations

Thames

[temz] N the Thamesel Támesis

Thames

[ˈtɛmz] n
the Thames → la Tamise

Thames

nThemse f; he’ll never set the Thames on fire (prov) → er hat das Pulver auch nicht erfunden (prov)

Thames

[tɛmz] n the Thamesil Tamigi
References in classic literature ?
he said, in a voice as remarkable for the softness and sweetness of its tones, as was his person for its rare proportions; "I may speak of these things, and be no braggart; for I have been down at both havens; that which is situate at the mouth of Thames, and is named after the capital of Old England, and that which is called 'Haven', with the addition of the word'New'; and have seen the scows and brigantines collecting their droves, like the gathering to the ark, being outward bound to the Island of Jamaica, for the purpose of barter and traffic in four-footed animals; but never before have I beheld a beast which verified the true scripture war-horse like this: 'He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength; he goeth on to meet the armed men.
For Pliny tells us of whales that embraced acres of living bulk, and Aldrovandus of others which measured eight hundred feet in length --Rope Walks and Thames Tunnels of Whales
We had a steamboat or two on the Thames, we had steam warships, and the beginnings of a steam commercial marine; I was getting ready to send out an expedition to discover America.
THE old Archiepiscopal Palace of Lambeth, on the southern bank of the Thames -with its Bishop's Walk and Garden, and its terrace fronting the river -- is an architectural relic of the London of former times, precious to all lovers of the picturesque, in the utilitarian London of the present day.
You have no more nat'ral sense of duty than the bed of this here Thames river has of a pile, and similarly it must be knocked into you.
My aunt was quite gracious on the subject of the Thames (it really did look very well with the sun upon it, though not like the sea before the cottage), but she could not relent towards the London smoke, which, she said, 'peppered everything'.
I was pretty good at most exercises in which countryboys are adepts, but, as I was conscious of wanting elegance of style for the Thames - not to say for other waters - I at once engaged to place myself under the tuition of the winner of a prizewherry who plied at our stairs, and to whom I was introduced by my new allies.
Brandon Beeches, in the Thames valley, was the seat of Sir Charles Brandon, seventh baronet of that name.
We passed over five or six rivers, many degrees broader and deeper than the Nile or the Ganges: and there was hardly a rivulet so small as the Thames at London-bridge.
Van Helsing roughly put the facts before us first, "The Czarina Catherine left the Thames yesterday morning.
The big building I had left was situated on the slope of a broad river valley, but the Thames had shifted perhaps a mile from its present position.
We remained at Weybridge until midday, and at that hour we found ourselves at the place near Shepperton Lock where the Wey and Thames join.