New Right

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New Right

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a range of radical right-wing groups and ideologies which advocate laissez-faire economic policies, anti-welfarism, and the belief in the rights of the individual over the common good

New′ Right′



n. (sometimes l.c.)
a political movement advocating conservative social values and a nationalistic foreign policy.
[1965–70]
New′ Right′ist, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Minister also called upon existing and new right holders to accommodate, assist and cooperate with the new right holders.
The period of conservative intellectual ferment after World War II, the emergence of the New Right in the early and middle 1960s, Barry Goldwater's related presidential campaign of 1964, the travails of the New Right during the later 1960s and 1970s, the period of New Right triumph in the 1980s, and the uncertain course of conservatism since then are all addressed in turn.
In practice, it is unlikely that the new right will have a huge impact.
GUIDANCE is being published to inform employers about the new right for staff to request time for training.
The New Right adopted Burnham's equation of the New Deal with totalitarianism as the centerpiece of its ideology.
In other words, they have about as much connection to the historic American Left as the pioneers of the New Right had to the Old Right.
As Woods points out, quoting Rudiger Safranski, the New Right has the problem of trying to create a cultural counter-hegemony at a time when the notion of hegemony itself is widely disputed.
And while intriguing in that this research does present some new material and fresh insights, there are also some weaknesses with the analysis of the New Right that detract from its contribution to scholarship on the reforms of the 1980s and 1990s.
Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt, who is also Cabinet Minister for Women, said the new right had proved popular with both parents and employers.
of the East Coast Hockey League, is the new right wing with the second unit.
Progressives would profit more by studying the way the New Right responded to life in the political wilderness.
Janice Irvine, a sociology professor at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, contends that campaigning against sex education has been "central in the rise to political power" of the New Right.