reverend

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rev·er·end

 (rĕv′ər-ənd)
adj.
1. Deserving reverence.
2. Relating to or characteristic of the clergy; clerical.
3. Reverend Abbr. Rev. Used as a title and form of address for certain clerics in many Christian churches. In formal usage, preceded by the: the Reverend Jane Doe; Reverend John Jones.
n. Informal
A cleric or minister. Used with the.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin reverendus, gerundive of reverērī, to revere; see revere1.]

reverend

(ˈrɛvərənd)
adj
1. worthy of reverence
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) relating to or designating a clergyman or the clergy
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) informal a clergyman
[C15: from Latin reverendus fit to be revered; see revere]

Reverend

(ˈrɛvərənd)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a title of respect for a clergyman. Abbreviations: Rev. or Revd See also Very Reverend, Right Reverend, Most Reverend
Usage: Reverend with a surname alone (Reverend Smith), as a term of address ("Yes, Reverend"), or in the salutation of a letter (Dear Rev. Mr Smith) are all generally considered to be wrong usage. Preferred are (the) Reverend John Smith or Reverend Mr Smith and Dear Mr Smith

rev•er•end

(ˈrɛv ər ənd, ˈrɛv rənd)

adj.
1. (cap.) (used as a title of respect applied or prefixed to the name of a member of the clergy or a religious order): the Reverend Timothy Cranshaw; Reverend Mother.
2. worthy of being revered; entitled to reverence.
3. pertaining to or characteristic of the clergy.
n.
4. a member of the clergy.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin reverendus, ger. of reverērī to revere1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Churchreverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)
spiritual leader - a leader in religious or sacred affairs
acolyte - someone who assists a priest or minister in a liturgical service; a cleric ordained in the highest of the minor orders in the Roman Catholic Church but not in the Anglican Church or the Eastern Orthodox Churches
anagnost - a cleric in the minor orders of the Eastern Orthodox Church who reads the lessons aloud in the liturgy (analogous to the lector in the Roman Catholic Church)
archdeacon - (Anglican Church) an ecclesiastical dignitary usually ranking just below a bishop
chaplain - a clergyman ministering to some institution
churchman, cleric, ecclesiastic, divine - a clergyman or other person in religious orders
curate, minister, minister of religion, parson, pastor, rector - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
deacon - a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders
domine, dominee, dominie, dominus - a clergyman; especially a settled minister or parson
ostiarius, ostiary, doorkeeper - the lowest of the minor Holy Orders in the unreformed Western Church but now suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church
lector, reader - someone who reads the lessons in a church service; someone ordained in a minor order of the Roman Catholic Church
officiant - a clergyman who officiates at a religious ceremony or service
ordinand - a person being ordained
ordinary - a clergyman appointed to prepare condemned prisoners for death
postulator - (Roman Catholic Church) someone who proposes or pleads for a candidate for beatification or canonization
preacher, preacher man, sermoniser, sermonizer - someone whose occupation is preaching the gospel
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
shepherd - a clergyman who watches over a group of people
subdeacon - a clergyman an order below deacon; one of the Holy Orders in the unreformed western Christian church and the eastern Catholic Churches but now suppressed in the Roman Catholic Church
vicar - (Church of England) a clergyman appointed to act as priest of a parish
vicar - (Episcopal Church) a clergyman in charge of a chapel
2.Reverend - a title of respect for a clergyman
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
Adj.1.reverend - worthy of adoration or reverencereverend - worthy of adoration or reverence  
sacred - concerned with religion or religious purposes; "sacred texts"; "sacred rites"; "sacred music"

reverend

noun
Informal. A person ordained for service in a Christian church:
Translations
المُوَقَّر، المُبَجَّل
ctihodný
pastor
nagytiszteletűtisztelendõ
séra

reverend

[ˈrevərənd]
A. ADJ (in titles) → reverendo
right or very reverendreverendísimo
Reverend Motherreverenda madre f
B. N (Catholic) → padre m, cura m; (Protestant) → pastor m

reverend

[ˈrɛvərənd]
adj
the Reverend John Smith (Anglican)le révérend John Smith; (Catholic)l'abbé John Smith; (Protestant)le pasteur John Smith
n (Anglican)révérend m; (Catholic)abbé m; (Protestant)pasteur m

reverend

adj the Reverend Robert Martin˜ Pfarrer Robert Martin; the Most Reverend John SmithErzbischof John Smith; the Very Reverend John SmithDekan John Smith; the Right Reverend John SmithBischof John Smith; the Reverend Motherdie Mutter Oberin
n (inf)˜ Pfarrer m

Reverend

[ˈrɛvrnd] adj (in titles) → reverendo/a

revere

(rəˈviə) verb
to feel or show great respect for. The students revere the professor.
reverence (ˈrevərəns) noun
great respect. He was held in reverence by those who worked for him.
Reverend (ˈrevərənd) noun
(usually abbreviated to Rev. when written) a title given to a clergyman. (the) Rev. John Brown.
reverent (ˈrevərənt) adjective
showing great respect. A reverent silence followed the professor's lecture.
ˈreverently adverb
References in classic literature ?
He held out his Sahara of his palm, and the Reverend laid his diminutive hand in it, and got so cordial a shake that we heard his glove burst under it.
The Reverend Professor Henslow has published a list of the plants collected by me at the Keeling Islands; and the Reverend J.
The reader will remember that at five minutes past eight in the evening-- about five and twenty hours after the arrival of the travellers in London-- Passepartout had been sent by his master to engage the services of the Reverend Samuel Wilson in a certain marriage ceremony, which was to take place the next day.
Chadband and threatened with being delivered over to the police unless he showed the reverend gentleman where he lived and unless he entered into, and fulfilled, an undertaking to appear in Cook's Court to-morrow night, "'to--mor--row--night," Mrs.
Extracts from the DIARY of THE REVEREND JULIAN GRAY.
They were happy to say that the reverend gentleman had been moved by the Spirit to accept the call, and on the ensuing Sabbath would break the bread of life for the brethren or break his neck in the attempt.
Sam felt very strongly disposed to give the reverend Mr.
Joseph Moody, of York, Maine, who died about eighty years since, made himself remarkable by the same eccentricity that is here related of the Reverend Mr.
She began by making me personally acquainted with the reverend gentleman--that is to say, she showed me the photographic portraits of him.
They still continued to live at the vicarage, the lady dividing her time between her father, her husband, and their poor parishioners, - and subsequently her rising family; and now that the Reverend Michael Millward has been gathered to his fathers, full of years and honours, the Reverend Richard Wilson has succeeded him to the vicarage of Linden-hope, greatly to the satisfaction of its inhabitants, who had so long tried and fully proved his merits, and those of his excellent and well-loved partner.
Kindly consider," he began, "cases of that kind are, as you are aware, under ecclesiastical jurisdiction; the reverend fathers are fond of going into the minutest details in cases of that kind," he said with a smile, which betrayed his sympathy with the reverend fathers' taste.
said Traddles - 'by the Reverend Horace - to Sophy - down in Devonshire.

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