showdown

(redirected from The Showdown)
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show·down

 (shō′doun′)
n.
1. An event, especially a confrontation, that forces an issue to a conclusion.
2. Games The laying down of the players' cards face up to determine the winner of the pot in poker.

showdown

(ˈʃəʊˌdaʊn)
n
1. informal an action that brings matters to a head or acts as a conclusion or point of decision
2. (Card Games) poker the exposing of the cards in the players' hands on the table at the end of the game

show•down

(ˈʃoʊˌdaʊn)

n.
1. (esp. in poker) the laying down of all the players' cards faceup to determine the winner in a hand.
2. a conclusive confrontation or settlement.
[1880–85, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.showdown - a hostile disagreement face-to-faceshowdown - a hostile disagreement face-to-face
disagreement - the speech act of disagreeing or arguing or disputing

showdown

noun (Informal) confrontation, crisis, clash, moment of truth, face-off (slang) They may be pushing him towards a final showdown with his party.
Translations
تَصْفِيَة الحِساب
rozhodující boj
endeligt opgør
lokauppgjör
rozhodujúci boj
hesaplaşmakartları açma

showdown

[ˈʃəʊdaʊn] Nenfrentamiento m (final)
to have a showdown with sbenfrentarse con algn
if it comes to a showdownsi llega a producirse un conflicto
the Suez showdownla crisis de Suez

showdown

[ˈʃəʊdaʊn] népreuve f de force

showdown

[ˈʃəʊˌdaʊn] nregolamento di conti

show

(ʃəu) past tense showed: past participles showed ~shown verb
1. to allow or cause to be seen. Show me your new dress; Please show your membership card when you come to the club; His work is showing signs of improvement.
2. to be able to be seen. The tear in your dress hardly shows; a faint light showing through the curtains.
3. to offer or display, or to be offered or displayed, for the public to look at. Which picture is showing at the cinema?; They are showing a new film; His paintings are being shown at the art gallery.
4. to point out or point to. He showed me the road to take; Show me the man you saw yesterday.
5. (often with (a)round) to guide or conduct. Please show this lady to the door; They showed him (a)round (the factory).
6. to demonstrate to. Will you show me how to do it?; He showed me a clever trick.
7. to prove. That just shows / goes to show how stupid he is.
8. to give or offer (someone) kindness etc. He showed him no mercy.
noun
1. an entertainment, public exhibition, performance etc. a horse-show; a flower show; the new show at the theatre; a TV show.
2. a display or act of showing. a show of strength.
3. an act of pretending to be, do etc (something). He made a show of working, but he wasn't really concentrating.
4. appearance, impression. They just did it for show, in order to make themselves seem more important than they are.
5. an effort or attempt. He put up a good show in the chess competition.
ˈshowy adjective
giving an impression of value by a bright and striking outward appearance. His clothes are too showy for my liking.
ˈshowiness noun
ˈshow-business noun
the entertainment industry, especially the branch of the theatre concerned with variety shows, comedy etc.
ˈshowcase noun
a glass case for displaying objects in a museum, shop etc.
ˈshowdown noun
an open, decisive quarrel etc ending a period of rivalry etc.
ˈshowground noun
an area where displays etc are held.
ˈshow-jumping noun
a competitive sport in which horses and their riders have to jump a series of artificial fences, walls etc.
ˈshowman noun
a person who owns or manages an entertainment, a stall at a fair etc.
ˈshowroom noun
a room where objects for sale etc are displayed for people to see. a car showroom.
give the show away
to make known a secret, trick etc.
good show!
that's good!.
on show
being displayed in an exhibition, showroom etc. There are over five hundred paintings on show here.
show off
1. to show or display for admiration. He showed off his new car by taking it to work.
2. to try to impress others with one's possessions, ability etc. She is just showing off – she wants everyone to know how well she speaks French (noun ˈshow-off a person who does this).
show up
1. to make obvious. This light shows up the places where I've mended this coat.
2. to reveal the faults of. Mary was so neat that she really showed me up.
3. to stand out clearly. The scratches showed up on the photograph.
4. to appear or arrive. I waited for her, but she never showed up.
References in periodicals archive ?
JOSH Brookes and Tommy Bridewell of Guisborough's Team Milwaukee Yamaha have high hopes ahead of this weekend's 10th round of the MCE Insurance British Superbike Championship as the Showdown gets underway at the legendary Assen circuit in Holland.
The winner and runner-up were announced last night in London during a private view of the Showdown exhibition at Winsor & Newton's Griffin Gallery.
If you think your unique answer is the highest scoring you can go into the Showdown and see who wins the game.
The Showdown, which pits drivers from the two NASCAR Camping World Series divisions, will be Jan.
In True Grit, the showdown occurs when John Wayne's Rooster Cogburn faces four gunmen led by Lucky Ned Pepper, but the fight is conducted from horseback.
I know that some of the other riders have been out testing there, but that doesn't faze me and I want to go out and enjoy those three races now we are in the Showdown.
Duncan was the highest qualifying driver from the West Series in the Showdown.
Duncan was the leader of the Showdown when the race was stopped for mandatory pit stops at lap 100.
The winner of each event during the Showdown on the final Sunday will walk away with $100,000, double the amount of last year's payout, making it the 'world's richest ride in rodeo'.
Beat said the Super Late Models will be included in the Showdown, the season-ending all-star race at Irwindale Speedway that features drivers from the two NASCAR Grand National Divisions: the West Series and the Busch East Series.
The Showdown is all about achieving your personal best, but equally important is benefiting from the life lessons learned through the goal- orientated nature of training and speed-related sports," says Andrea Fairchild, Nike USA.