novel

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nov·el 1

 (nŏv′əl)
n.
1. A fictional prose narrative of considerable length, typically having a plot that is unfolded by the actions, speech, and thoughts of the characters.
2. The literary genre represented by novels.

[Ultimately from Old Italian novella, piece of news, chit-chat, tale, novella, from Vulgar Latin *novella, from neuter pl. of Latin novellus, diminutive of novus, new; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

nov·el 2

 (nŏv′əl)
adj.
Strikingly new, unusual, or different. See Synonyms at new.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin novellus, diminutive of novus; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

nov′el·ly adv.

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an extended work in prose, either fictitious or partly so, dealing with character, action, thought, etc, esp in the form of a story
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the novel the literary genre represented by novels
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (usually plural) obsolete a short story or novella, as one of those in the Decameron of Boccaccio
[C15: from Old French novelle, from Latin novella (narrātiō) new (story); see novel2]

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
adj
of a kind not seen before; fresh; new; original: a novel suggestion.
[C15: from Latin novellus new, diminutive of novus new]

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
n
(Law) Roman law a new decree or an amendment to an existing statute

nov•el1

(ˈnɒv əl)

n.
a fictitious prose narrative of considerable length and complexity, portraying characters and usu. presenting a sequential organization of action and scenes.
[1560–70; < Italian novella (storia) new kind of story]
nov`el•is′tic, adj.
nov`el•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

nov•el2

(ˈnɒv əl)

adj.
of a new kind; different from anything seen or known before: a novel idea.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French, Old French) < Latin novellus fresh, young, novel, diminutive of novus new]
syn: See new.

novel

A fictitious narrative in which characters and action are usually a reflection of real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novel - an extended fictional work in prosenovel - an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
detective novel, mystery novel - novel in which the reader is challenged to solve a puzzle before the detective explains it at the end
dime novel, penny dreadful - a melodramatic paperback novel
novelette, novella - a short novel
roman a clef - a novel in which actual persons and events are disguised as fictional characters
romance - a novel dealing with idealized events remote from everyday life
roman fleuve - a French novel in the form of a long chronicle of a family or other social group
2.novel - a printed and bound book that is an extended work of fiction; "his bookcases were filled with nothing but novels"; "he burned all the novels"
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
Adj.1.novel - original and of a kind not seen before; "the computer produced a completely novel proof of a well-known theorem"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"
2.novel - pleasantly new or different; "common sense of a most refreshing sort"
new - not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered; "a new law"; "new cars"; "a new comet"; "a new friend"; "a new year"; "the New World"

novel

1
noun story, tale, fiction, romance, narrative He had all but finished writing a first novel.
Quotations
"Yes - oh dear yes - the novel tells a story" [E.M. Forster Aspects of the Novel]
"There are three rules for writing the novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are" [W. Somerset Maugham]
"novel: a short story padded" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"If you try to nail anything down in the novel, either it kills the novel, or the novel gets up and walks away with the nail" [D.H. Lawrence Phoenix]

novel

2
adjective new, different, original, fresh, unusual, innovative, uncommon, singular, ground-breaking, left-field (informal) Staging your own murder mystery party is a novel way to entertain a group of friends.
common, traditional, usual, ordinary, ancient, old-fashioned, customary, run-of-the-mill

novel

adjective
1. Not the same as what was previously known or done:
2. Not usual or ordinary:
Slang: offbeat.
Translations
جَديد وَغريبروايةرِوَايَةٌرِوايَه
románneotřelýnezvyklýnovýoriginální
romanhidtil ukendtny
رمان
romaaniuudenlainenuusi
उपन्यासकथाकहानी
roman
regény
novel
nÿr; frumlegur, nÿstárlegurskáldsaga
小説新奇
소설
jaunsnebijisromāns
roman
nezvyklýromán
roman
roman
นิยาย
romanyeni ve farklıalışılmamış
tiểu thuyết

novel

[ˈnɒvəl]
A. ADJ [idea, suggestion, method] → original, novedoso
it was a novel experience for himera una experiencia nueva para él
B. Nnovela f

novel

[ˈnɒvəl]
nroman m
adj (= new) [idea, approach] → original(e); [experience, situation] → nouveau(nouvelle)

novel

1
nRoman m

novel

2
adjneu(artig)

novel

[ˈnɒvl]
1. adjoriginale, nuovo/a after n
2. n (Literature) → romanzo

novel1

(ˈnovəl) noun
a book telling a long story in prose. the novels of Charles Dickens.
ˈnovelist noun
the writer of a novel. Dickens was a great novelist.

novel2

(ˈnovəl) adjective
new and strange. a novel idea.
ˈnoveltyplural ˈnovelties noun
1. newness and strangeness. It took her a long time to get used to the novelty of her surroundings.
2. something new and strange. Snow is a novelty to people from hot countries.
3. a small, cheap manufactured thing sold as a toy or souvenir. a stall selling novelties.

novel

رِوَايَةٌ román roman Roman μυθιστόρημα novela romaani roman roman romanzo 小説 소설 roman roman powieść romance роман roman นิยาย roman tiểu thuyết 小说
References in classic literature ?
The traditional parts of this system are, as Cervantes tried to show, for the chief part, barbarous and obsolete; the modern additions are largely due to the novel readers and writers of our own century--most of them half-educated women,rebelliously slavish, superstitious, sentimental, full of the intense egotism fostered by their struggle for personal liberty, and, outside their families, with absolutely no social sentiment except love.
You are very right, friend," said the curate; "but for all that, if the novel pleases me you must let me copy it.
While they were talking Cardenio had taken up the novel and begun to read it, and forming the same opinion of it as the curate, he begged him to read it so that they might all hear it.
Master Nicholas added his entreaties to the same effect, and Sancho too; seeing which, and considering that he would give pleasure to all, and receive it himself, the curate said, "Well then, attend to me everyone, for the novel begins thus.
To the romance the novel is what photography is to painting.
If she read that the heroine of the novel was nursing a sick man, she longed to move with noiseless steps about the room of a sick man; if she read of a member of Parliament making a speech, she longed to be delivering the speech; if she read of how Lady Mary had ridden after the hounds, and had provoked her sister-in-law, and had surprised everyone by her boldness, she too wished to be doing the same.
The hero of the novel was already almost reaching his English happiness, a baronetcy and an estate, and Anna was feeling a desire to go with him to the estate, when she suddenly felt that HE ought to feel ashamed, and that she was ashamed of the same thing.
the novel, and he did not anticipate any keen enjoyment from it in its dramatized form.
The third was the only act in which, in his dramatization, he had taken any real liberties with the text of the novel.
I have in my possession a paper, yellow with age, that was sent soon after the novel appeared, containing "The Pedigree of the Family of Appine," wherein it is said that "Alan 3rd Baron of Appine was not killed at Flowdoun, tho there, but lived to a great old age.
My elder brother, for whom there was no place in the office where I worked, had found one in a store, and he beguiled the leisure that light trade left on his hands by reading the novels of Captain Marryat.
It is long since I frequented it, and if the novels that describe its present singularities are accurate much in it is now changed.