liberation theology

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liberation theology

n.
A school of theology, especially prevalent in the Roman Catholic Church in Latin America, that finds in the Gospel a call to free people from political, social, and economic oppression.

liberation theologian n.

liberation theology

n
(Theology) the belief that Christianity involves not only faith in the teachings of the Church but also a commitment to change social and political conditions from within in societies in which it is considered exploitation and oppression exist

libera′tion theol`ogy


n.
a modern Christian theology stressing liberation from racial, economic, and political oppression.
[1970–75]
libera′tion theolo`gian, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liberation theology - a form of Christian theology (developed by South American Roman Catholics) that emphasizes social and political liberation as the anticipation of ultimate salvation
theological system, theology - a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings; "Jewish theology"; "Roman Catholic theology"
Translations

liberation theology

nteologia della liberazione
References in periodicals archive ?
The Latin American feminist theology of liberation is a movement that makes a critical, political and religious analysis of patriarchy as a pyramidal system, and of the hierarchical structure of society and the church.
Although grounded in the beliefs and values of the Judeo-Christian faith traditions and the theology of liberation and feminist theoreticians, the book is written with sensitivity to those who ascribe to different faith traditions and those who claim allegiance to none, reflecting universal values of egalitarianism and equality, inclusion, dignity, compassion, and justice.
An atmosphere against my theology was created in the Vatican, in several diocesan curias and among several bishops," Sobrino wrote, "and in general against the theology of liberation.
The theology of personal piety, on which Hughes Old says classical Protestantism has thrived since the days of Martin Luther, [34] is lived out in a political theology of liberation, equality, and justice for the people of God.
It can be argued that it is precisely because the worldview of Black Americans and White Americans is so different that eventually a Black theology of liberation emerged to relate the true story of a people whose history and very existence has been ignored, denied and trampled upon for centuries.
In the late sixties and early seventies, when Morrison was writing the novel, black theologians struggled to articulate a theology of liberation for their people, to repeat Morrison's words, "in a period of intense political activity.
Other important issues that Aguilar raises in the book are already classical in the theology of liberation way of doing theology: God, who is love, is a liberator; God's partiality and the church's preferential option for the poor and the marginalized; the key role of the Christian communities (church) of the grassroots; the need to sustain Christian utopias displacing consumerism, as well as the fundamental methodological action-reflection way of doing theology.
Chapter 6 recapitulates ideas of the good and beauty, relating them to the aesthetics of contemporary theology of liberation in the American world.
The formal articulation of liberation theology emerged almost simultaneously on the North and South American continents in the writings of James Cone, Black Theology and Black Power (1969) and shortly thereafter in his A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), as well as in the volume of Gustavo Gutierrez, A Theology of Liberation (1971).
CONE is Briggs Distinguished Professor at Union Theological Seminary and the author of many books on black theology of liberation, including Martin and Malcolm and America.
At the same time, he said, "I worry that too many theologians my age and younger who are interested in a return to the sources are facilely dismissive of the theology of liberation, whose pioneers drank deeply from the waters of the original ressourcement that led to Vatican II.
s own theology of liberation for children (to which he devotes a whole chapter) seems not to influence his support for divorce at a time in which many mainstream theologians (who are aware of the research on the effects of divorce on children) are moving toward more conservative positions.