theonomy

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Related to Theonomist: The Economist

theonomy

(θɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the state of being governed by God
References in periodicals archive ?
Although he heatedly denied being a theonomist, Colson told a Southern Baptist pastors conference in June 2007 that Christians' purpose in life is "to take command and dominion over every aspect of life, whether it's music, science, law, politics, communities, families-to bring Christianity to bear in every single area of life.
And it's particularly fitting that the target is the home-schooling community where theonomists have had some of their greatest successes.
In addition to North's controversial belief in stoning, theonomist writer Greg Bahnsen cites other points of disagreement, including Rushdoony's belief that Christians ought to observe dietary laws today.
He is affiliated with Bahnsen Theological Seminary, a theonomist institution in California named after the late Christian reconstructionist thinker.
Mr Harding, who educated his five sons at home instead of in state schools, denied being a Theonomist.
But he did not mention that leading US Theonomist Greg Bahnsen - who died six months ago - preached his twisted beliefs at Shettleston two years ago.
Although Robertson has always denied being a Reconstructionist, Rushdoony once made an appearance on Robertson's show and much of the televangelist's rhetoric about Christians taking control echoes theonomist rhetoric.
It is not necessary to agree with theonomist Rousas John Rushdoony that all statist redistribution schemes are "theft" (36) in order to see that coerced giving and acceptance of same is not a community-building process.
Theonomist Gary North argues that applying these principles over time will naturally make Christians affluent, enabling them to procreate effectively and prolifically.
Theonomists such as Christian Reconstructionists maintain that God's law still provides a normative framework for today's personal and social activities and call for a radical reformation of civil governments so that they might conform to God's law.
Theonomists and reconstructionists call for the universal rule of theocratic republics governed entirely according to Biblical principles, with non-Christians excluded from voting and citizenship.
Libertarians and positivists affirm the former while denying the later; majoritarians and theonomists elevate the second over the prominence of the former.