theropod

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the·ro·pod

 (thîr′ə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of various chiefly carnivorous saurischian dinosaurs of the large group Theropoda, characterized by bipedal locomotion, long jaws, and short forelimbs, and including allosaurus and velociraptor.

[From New Latin Thēropoda, suborder name : Greek thēr, wild beast; see ghwer- in Indo-European roots + New Latin -poda, -pod.]

the′ro·pod′ adj.

theropod

(ˈθɪərəpɒd)
n
(Palaeontology) any bipedal carnivorous saurischian dinosaur of the suborder Theropoda, having strong hind legs and grasping hands. They lived in Triassic to Cretaceous times and included tyrannosaurs and megalosaurs
[C19: from New Latin theropoda, from Greek thēr beast + pous foot]
theropodan n, adj

the•ro•pod

(ˈθɪər əˌpɒd)

n.
any saurischian dinosaur of the suborder Theropoda, comprising carnivorous dinosaurs that had short forelimbs and moved on powerful hind legs.
[< New Latin Theropoda (1881)]

the·ro·pod

(thîr′ə-pŏd′)
One of the two main types of saurischian dinosaurs, widespread during the Mesozoic Era. Theropods were meat eaters, walked on two legs, and had small forelimbs and a large skull with long jaws and sharp teeth. Most theropods were of small or medium size, but some grew very large, like the tyrannosaurus. Compare sauropod.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theropod - any of numerous carnivorous dinosaurs of the Triassic to Cretaceous with short forelimbs that walked or ran on strong hind legstheropod - any of numerous carnivorous dinosaurs of the Triassic to Cretaceous with short forelimbs that walked or ran on strong hind legs
saurischian, saurischian dinosaur - herbivorous or carnivorous dinosaur having a three-pronged pelvis like that of a crocodile
suborder Theropoda, Theropoda - carnivorous saurischian dinosaurs with short forelimbs; Jurassic and Cretaceous
ceratosaur, ceratosaurus - primitive medium-sized theropod; swift-running bipedal carnivorous dinosaur having grasping hands with sharp claws and a short horn between the nostrils; Jurassic in North America
carnosaur - large carnivorous bipedal dinosaur having huge claws
tyrannosaur, tyrannosaurus, Tyrannosaurus rex - large carnivorous bipedal dinosaur having enormous teeth with knifelike serrations; may have been a scavenger rather than an active predator; later Cretaceous period in North America
allosaur, allosaurus - late Jurassic carnivorous dinosaur; similar to but somewhat smaller than tyrannosaurus
compsognathus - very small bipedal carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic in Bavaria
herrerasaur, herrerasaurus - a kind of theropod dinosaur found in Argentina
eoraptor - a theropod dinosaur of the genus Eoraptor
megalosaur, megalosaurus - gigantic carnivorous bipedal dinosaur of the Jurassic or early Cretaceous in Europe
ornithomimid - lightly built medium-sized dinosaur having extremely long limbs and necks with small heads and big brains and large eyes
maniraptor - advanced carnivorous theropod
References in periodicals archive ?
One way of better understanding how extinct theropods moved is to examine locomotion in extant theropods, birds, because birds retain many (homologous) anatomical similarities to their ancestors.
It resembles small theropods like the deinonychus, coelophysis and dromaeosaurus - extinct 65 million years.
On an evolutionary scale, this transition happened until theropods developed mouths that resembled the bird beaks seen today.
This research has shown that one group of theropods displays the trend toward inflation of the "thinking" brain we see in living birds, suggesting that some non-bird theropod dinosaurs probably were capable of advanced learned behavior.
Theropods were vicious hunters who would prey on others.
It belonged to the group of dinosaurs called theropods, which slowly transitioned into birds (SN Online: 7/31/14).
Martin Ezcurra, who is studying for his PhD, said the Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, belonged to the family of two-legged theropods which included famous meateaters such as Jurassic Park star Velociraptor, Carnotaurus and T.
Until now, herbivorous theropods were known only in close dinosaur relatives of modern-day birds, the team said.
This book details the history of the theropods, sauropods, ornithopods, thyreophorans and all other species found in the British Isles.
The fossil record indicates that birds emerged within theropods (a group of carnivorous dinosaurs that includes species such as Tyrannosaurus rex) in the Late Jurassic.
Theropods such as velociraptor and T rex - the species linked to modern birds - were more innovative and adaptable with their habitat and ways of gathering food, a study from Adelaide University has revealed.
Theropods were good hunters and devoured insects, eggs, turtles, and lizards.