Thersites


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Thersites

(θəˈsaɪtiːz)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) the ugliest and most evil-tongued fighter on the Greek side in the Trojan War, killed by Achilles when he mocked him

Ther•si•tes

(θərˈsaɪ tiz)

n.
a Greek who fought at Troy, known for his ugliness and foulmouthed, quarrelsome nature.
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References in classic literature ?
An additional and well-marked feature being wanted to convince Penelope, the writer has taken the hunched shoulders of Thersites (who is mentioned immediately after Eurybates in the "Iliad") and put them on to Eurybates' back.
The rest now took their seats and kept to their own several places, but Thersites still went on wagging his unbridled tongue--a man of many words, and those unseemly; a monger of sedition, a railer against all who were in authority, who cared not what he said, so that he might set the Achaeans in a laugh.
Thus railed Thersites, but Ulysses at once went up to him and rebuked him sternly.
She ceased to look on him as something wantonly malevolent, a Thersites recklessly slandering his betters.
Therefore, Sweet railed at Pitman as vainly as Thersites railed at Ajax: his raillery, however it may have eased his soul, gave no popular vogue to Current Shorthand.
About this time Thersites Junior really began to make something like a reputation, and to walk abroad habitually with a bank-note comfortably lodged among the other papers in his pocketbook.
DEAR SIR--Please advertise a series of twelve Racy Prints, from my fertile pencil, entitled, 'Scenes of Modern Prison Life,' by Thersites Junior.
If the reader desires to make acquaintance with the associates of my captivity, I must refer him to "Scenes of Modern Prison Life," by Thersites Junior, now doubtless extremely scarce, but producible to the demands of patience and perseverance, I should imagine, if anybody will be so obliging as to pass a week or so over the catalogue of the British Museum.
Croiset remark, the abusive Thersites in the "Aethiopis" is clearly copied from the Thersites of the "Iliad"; in the same poem Antilochus, slain by Memnon and avenged by Achilles, is obviously modelled on Patroclus.
About the middle came the lot of Atalanta; she, seeing the great fame of an athlete, was unable to resist the temptation: and after her there followed the soul of Epeus the son of Panopeus passing into the nature of a woman cunning in the arts; and far away among the last who chose, the soul of the jester Thersites was putting on the form of a monkey.
83-84) and in Troilus and Cressida when Thersites calls Ajax a "mongrel beef-witted lord
For this sin he has been made into a Thersites figure, a stick-in-the-mud Founder, or a J.