noumenon

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Related to Thing in itself: noumenal, An sich, noumena

nou·me·non

 (no͞o′mə-nŏn′)
n. pl. nou·me·na (-nə)
In the philosophy of Kant, an object as it is in itself independent of the mind, as opposed to a phenomenon. Also called thing-in-itself.

[German, from Greek nooumenon, from neuter present passive participle of noein, to perceive by thought, from nous, mind.]

nou′men·al (-mə-nəl) adj.

noumenon

(ˈnuːmɪnən; ˈnaʊ-)
n, pl -na (-nə)
1. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Kant) a thing as it is in itself, not perceived or interpreted, incapable of being known, but only inferred from the nature of experience. Compare phenomenon3 See also thing-in-itself
2. (Philosophy) the object of a purely intellectual intuition
[C18: via German from Greek: thing being thought of, from noein to think, perceive; related to nous mind]
ˈnoumenal adj
ˈnoumenalism n
ˈnoumenalist n, adj
ˌnoumeˈnality n
ˈnoumenally adv

nou•me•non

(ˈnu məˌnɒn)

n., pl. -na (-nə).
something that can be the object only of a purely intellectual, nonsensuous intuition.
[1790–1800; < Greek nooúmenon a thing being perceived, n. use of neuter of passive present participle of noeîn to perceive]
nou′me•nal, adj.

noumenon Kantianism.

1. that which can be the object only of a purely intellectual, nonsensuous intuition, the thing-in-itself (Ding an Sich).
2. an unknowable object (as God), the existence of which is not capable of proof. — noumenal, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.noumenon - the intellectual conception of a thing as it is in itself, not as it is known through perception
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Like the different appearances of the table to a number of simultaneous observers, the different particulars that belong to one physical object are to be collected together by continuity and inherent laws of correlation, not by their supposed causal connection with an unknown assumed existent called a piece of matter, which would be a mere unnecessary metaphysical thing in itself.