Thingvellir


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Thing·vel·lir

 (thĭng′vĕt′lîr′)
A broad valley in southwest Iceland east of Reykjavik, noted for its rocky chasms formed by the spreading of the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. It was the meeting place of the Althing from 930 until 1798.
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First he heads to Thingvellir National Park to explore a vast crack in the Earth's surface.
First up he heads to Thingvellir National Park to explore a vast crack in the Earth's surface.
First up he heads to Thingvellir National Park in Iceland to explore a vast 40,000-mile crack in the Earth's surface.
And just the | Right, Alexander Armstrong in iceland's frozen wastes, with world champion female Viking wrestler, Eva Dogg Johannsdottir and, left, with archaeologist Kevin Martin preparing to snorkel in the freezing water of Thingvellir National Park running of the sledge and the howling of the wind, and the occasional unintelligible cry from me.
First up, he heads to Thingvellir National Park in Iceland to explore a 40,000-mile crack in the Earth's surface.
Our tour includes the stunning Gullfoss waterfall, the temperamental geysers in the appropriately named Geysir geothermal area, and the historic Thingvellir National Park, where American and Eurasian tectonic plates are slowly shifting apart.
But the proximity to Reykjavik and South Iceland's popular Golden Circle tourist route (covering national park Thingvellir, waterfall Gullfoss and the geyser field at Haukadalur) was also a key factor.
He saw the dramatic contrasts of Blue Lagoon, the volcanic fields of Thingvellir National Park and the majestic mountains surrounding the city.
On our way back to the city Siggi takes us via Thingvellir National Park, where the American and Eurasian tectonic plates pull apart a few centimetres every year.
whale fjords Once upon dry land we headed for the Thingvellir National Park, about 50 kilometres from Reykjavik, where we really got a feeling for the isolation, the exposure and the vagaries of weather on this island that lies just below the Arctic Circle.
One six-mile hike, in Thingvellir National Park, headed through the deep fissures of the giant faultline where the European and North American tectonic plates are pulling apart.