Ten Commandments

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Related to Third Commandment: The First Commandment

Ten Commandments

pl.n. Bible
The ten injunctions given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai, serving as the basis of Mosaic Law.

Ten Commandments

pl n
(Bible) the Ten Commandments Old Testament the commandments summarizing the basic obligations of man towards God and his fellow men, delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai engraved on two tables of stone (Exodus 20:1–17). Also known as: the Decalogue

Ten′ Command′ments


n.pl.
the precepts spoken by God to Israel, delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai; the Decalogue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ten Commandments - the biblical commandments of MosesTen Commandments - the biblical commandments of Moses  
Translations
Diez MandamientosDiez Palabras
tízparancsolat
boðorðin tíu
cele zece porunci
References in classic literature ?
This threat so terrified the King of Madagao that in hastening to comply he fell over his own feet, breaking the Third Commandment.
You shall not misuse the name of the Lord your God," says the third commandment (Ex.
Every time you use the name of God (the I Am in you) in a negative way, you are actually breaking the third commandment, 'Thou shall not take the name of the Lord thy God (the I Am) in vain.
It comes from the third commandment in His 10 rules for happy living as I like to think of them, and translates into this: "Do not use my name disrespectfully.
As regards the Third Commandment, the Christian Sunday is not merely a substitute for the Jewish Sabbath.
This clearly breaks the third commandment of womanhood (after 1.
The third commandment states, "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord, thy G-d in vain--la-shav.
The Third Commandment is unequivocal when it says: "You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.
His blasphemy incurred the ultimate Divine retribution as expressed in the Third Commandment of the Decalogue: .
Ephraim Radner's essay illuminates an unusual connection between the words for "vain" of the third commandment (in Hebrew, shay, "lie"; in Greek, mataios, "empty") with the kenosis, the "emptying," of Christ.
As for oath-taking, the Catholic Church, in light of the Third Commandment, rejects the use of solemn oaths to join or advance in a fraternal society like the Masons.