Thomas Babington Macaulay


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Noun1.Thomas Babington Macaulay - English historian noted for his history of England (1800-1859)Thomas Babington Macaulay - English historian noted for his history of England (1800-1859)
References in classic literature ?
An author who had much to do with preparing me for the quixotic folly in point was that Thomas Babington Macaulay, who taught simplicity of diction in phrases of as "learned length and thundering sound," as any he would have had me shun, and who deplored the Latinistic English of Johnson in terms emulous of the great doctor's orotundity and ronderosity.
The term is derived from the name of British politician Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), an individual who was instrumental in the introduction of English as the medium of instruction for higher education in India".
In British-ruled India, MP Thomas Babington Macaulay developed India's 1860 Penal Code.
But then there is Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859), who observed watchful silence until the age of four, and then replied to a lady who clucked and fussed over him when he was scalded by spilled coffee, "Thank you, madam, the agony has abated somewhat.
As the British historian Thomas Babington Macaulay wrote in 1830, "We cannot absolutely prove that those are in error who tell us that society has reached a turning point, that we have seen our best days.
However, Thomas Babington Macaulay, the Law Member of Governor-General's Council and the Chairman of the Committee of Public Instruction in Bengal, finally resolved the matter in the favour of the Anglicists in his minutes of 1835 by choosing the western line of education with English as the medium of instruction (Ashton, 1988: 23).
A incursao pelas concepcoes de historia em lingua inglesa prossegue com Thomas Babington Macaulay, apresentado por Sergio Campos Goncalves.
But as Kuper shows in the fascinating case of Thomas Babington Macaulay, even blood siblings sometimes were jealous of each other's wives and lives outside the family.
Also included are commentaries: early modern interpretations of the text by Issac Taylor, John Stuart Mills, and Thomas Babington Macaulay, and modern assessments (four new) that consider Herodotus' place in historiography and issues related to the Persian Wars and aspects of Herodotus' work.
In a letter to Macvey Napier, the editor of the Edinburg Review, Thomas Babington Macaulay wrote from India on June 15, 1837 about his plan to write an essay on Sir William Temple "and the part which he took in the controversy about the ancients and moderns; the Oxford confederacy against Bentley; and the memorable victory which Bentley obtained, will be good subjects.
Their tradition was carried on by the great historians of the 19th century: Thomas Babington Macaulay, Hippolyte Taine, Francis Parkman, Alexis de Tocqueville, George Bancroft, Jacob Burckhardt, and Thomas Carlyle all composed their epics with an eye to the literary immortality they eventually achieved.