thusness


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thusness

(ˈðʌsnəs)
n
the state or quality of being thus or in a certain manner
References in periodicals archive ?
And only the likes of poets extraordinaire Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman could go there in spirit, as Thoreau did on Mount Ktaadin when he experienced "a moment where all the explanations and assumptions fell away, and he was confronted with the wonderful, inexplicable thusness of things.
Even when we use the mother tongue, how we relate will shift from a perspective of exteriority (I am other than you) to paradoxical transpermeability (I am you and me and thusness in a global sense, AND I am this identity-me in a local sense).
The same sound is not sound, but the thusness of sound.
Here, Duckworth first shows how Mipam uses reason and logic to prove Buddha-nature and the divine nature of all appearances, but ultimately privileges reflexive awareness in meditative experience for the actual perception of thusness and Buddha-nature.
outside, nor in the middle, it is not contemplated in terms of suchness and thusness, gradual or progressive The motion of the mind is like a stream forever flowing [.
While Dogen used such traditional Buddhist terms as mind-only, Dharma-nature, thusness, and Buddha-nature synonymously throughout his works, he regarded Buddha-nature as particularly fitting and central--perhaps because the term retained more personal, affective, and existential connotations as compared to the impersonal, speculative, and transcendental connotations of the other terms.
As she concludes: 'Perhaps the most distinctive way Mahayana Buddhism has tried to negotiate the "finger pointing at the moon" issue is through the ostentive language of thusness or suchness' (170).
The entire excellence of doing and wishing what is good is, then, embedded in the here and now, the thusness of substances for whose existence there is no accounting.
In TUOT the thusness of the world accesses consciousness through fiction.
Only by chance were we born into human form, only by chance were we lucky enough to hear the teachings of Thusness, to receive the seeds of enlightenment into our hands.
In his most recent work Snyder addresses more fully his interest in the emptiness or, to use a Buddhist term, the thusness of nature, regarded as a reality that "stands for nothing.
For those who would see directly into essential nature, the idea of the sacred is a delusion and an obstruction: it diverts us from seeing what is before our eyes: plain thusness.