Tiglath-pileser III


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Tiglath-pileser III

n
(Biography) known as Pulu. died ?727 bc, king of Assyria (745–727), who greatly extended his empire, subjugating Syria and Palestine

Tig•lath-pi•le•ser III

(ˈtɪg læθ pɪˈli zər, -paɪ-)
n.
died 727 B.C., king of Assyria 745–727.
References in periodicals archive ?
Professor Hayim Tadmor, an eminent Assyriologist and historian, states that Assyrian reliefs, from the time of Tiglath-pileser III onward, frequently portray an "Assyrian scribe" writing on a board or tablet next to an "Aramaic scribe" writing on papyrus or a parchment scroll.
Al video hecho circular hace tres semanas en la red mundial por el Estado Islamico (El) en el que exhibe la destruccion de piezas que perpetro en el Museo de Mosul, le han sucedido las devastaciones de Nimrud--la antigua ciudad biblica de Kalakh--, que hospeda los palacios de Asumasirpal II, Salmanasar II y Tiglath-Pileser III, y la de los sitios arqueologicos de Hatra--capital del imperio Arsacida o Parto, fundado mas de 2000 anos a.
Other kings represented include Tiglath-Pileser III (744-727 BCE), Sargon II (721-705 BCE), Sennacherib (704-681 BCE), and Ashurbanipal (669-627 BCE).
The Inscriptions of Tiglath-Pileser iii King of Assyria.
During the brief reign of Pekah, the king of Israel was persuaded by Rezin, the king of Aram-Damascus to form a coalition, which Judah refused to join, in order to resist the growing strength of the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III.
153-54 as part of Appendix B), seven depend on or are substantiated by newly or relatively newly published texts (Kurba'il Statue of Shalmaneser III (1962), Tell Rimah stela of Adad-narari III (1968), Iran stela of Tiglath-pileser III (1972)), or newly edited texts.
Chapter two presents the archaeological evidence for the campaigns of Tiglath-pileser III, Shalmaneser V, and Sargon II against the kingdom of Israel, whose capital city Samaria was ultimately captured in 722 B.
His example was followed by Tiglath-pileser III and by Sennacherib, whose Lachish reliefs bear witness to the flaying and impaling of chosen victims (see note 14 above).
The village was abandoned in the late eighth century, probably during the campaign of Tiglath-pileser III (Gal and Alexandre 2000: 178, 201).
After Assyrian monarch Tiglath-Pileser III campaigned in and ultimately captured and exiled Israel, the Northern Kingdom (621 BCE), Judah, the Southern Kingdom, became a vassal state of the Assyrian Empire.
campaign of Tiglath-Pileser III, who established the only known monument "on the border of Egypt.
The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Kings of Assyria.