Tiglath-pileser III


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Tiglath-pileser III

n
(Biography) known as Pulu. died ?727 bc, king of Assyria (745–727), who greatly extended his empire, subjugating Syria and Palestine

Tig•lath-pi•le•ser III

(ˈtɪg læθ pɪˈli zər, -paɪ-)
n.
died 727 B.C., king of Assyria 745–727.
References in periodicals archive ?
campaign of Tiglath-Pileser III, who established the only known monument "on the border of Egypt.
Other kings represented include Tiglath-Pileser III (744-727 BCE), Sargon II (721-705 BCE), Sennacherib (704-681 BCE), and Ashurbanipal (669-627 BCE).
The movement of both Phoenicians and Greeks began in the late ninth and early eighth centuries, at the precise moment when Assyrian power in the east underwent a decline from the succession of Shamshi-Adad V (824 BC) until the reign of Tiglath-Pileser III (745-727 BC).
During the brief reign of Pekah, the king of Israel was persuaded by Rezin, the king of Aram-Damascus to form a coalition, which Judah refused to join, in order to resist the growing strength of the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III.
The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Kings of Assyria.
until the Assyrian campaign of Tiglath-pileser III (734), Israel organized and developed exceptional chariotry and cavalry that engaged in nearly 200 years of effective border defense.
Its northern portion was annexed in 732 by Tiglath-pileser III and transformed into the province of Magidu (Megiddo).
The third and fourth chapters treat the political history of Byblos from the time of Tiglath-pileser III to the advent of Alexander the Great, while the fifth and sixth chapters address, respectively, the city's slow decline and its strategic evolution from the second haft of the 400S B.
53-57, together with map plates VII through XVIII at the back of the book, present detailed information about the different traffic areas created and maintained by specific Assyrian monarchs (Adad-nirari II, Tukulti-Ninurta II, Assurnasirpal II, Shalmanezer III, Tiglath-pileser III, Sargon II, Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Ashurbanipal).
Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon.
One example appears in the annals of Tiglath-Pileser III, who describes the extent of his conquests during his 738 campaign against Hamath by enumerating toponyms with particular reference to the mountains, which served as district borders.
Redating of the Til Barsip painting of the enthroned ruler from Room 24 to Sargon II, based upon isolated textile patterns, rather than the close parallel to the same overall motif of the seated king in the reliefs of Tiglath-pileser III (p.