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, Saint First century ad.
Christian leader and companion of Saint Paul. An epistle of the New Testament, ascribed to Paul, is addressed to him.

Ti·tus 1

 (tī′təs) Originally Flavius Sabinus Vespasianus. ad 39-81.
Emperor of Rome (79-81) whose reign was marked by the construction of the Roman Colosseum. He commanded the siege and capture of Jerusalem (70).

Ti·tus 2

See Table at Bible.


1. (Biography) New Testament
a. Titus, SaintMGreekRELIGION: clergymanRELIGION: saintSaint. a Greek disciple and helper of Saint Paul. Feast day: Jan 26 or Aug 25
b. the book written to him (in full The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to Titus), containing advice on pastoral matters
2. (Biography) full name Titus Flavius Sabinus Vespasianus. ?40–81 ad, Roman emperor (78–81 ad)


(ˈtaɪ təs)

1. a disciple and companion of the apostle Paul, to whom Paul is supposed to have addressed an Epistle.
2. this New Testament Epistle.
3. (Titus Flavius Sabinus Vespasianus) A.D. 40?–81, Roman emperor 79–81.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Titus - a Greek disciple and helper of Saint Paul
2.Titus - Emperor of RomeTitus - Emperor of Rome; son of Vespasian (39-81)
3.Titus - a New Testament book containing Saint Paul's epistle to Titus; contains advice on pastoral matters
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
References in classic literature ?
He was on the steamer when I went down to Peru to help the Titus Brothers dig the big tunnel.
I could recite you the whole of Thucydides, Xenophon, Plutarch, Titus Livius, Tacitus, Strada, Jornandes, Dante, Montaigne, Shakspeare, Spinoza, Machiavelli, and Bossuet.
Philip of Macedon, not the father of Alexander the Great, but he who was conquered by Titus Quintius, had not much territory compared to the greatness of the Romans and of Greece who attacked him, yet being a warlike man who knew how to attract the people and secure the nobles, he sustained the war against his enemies for many years, and if in the end he lost the dominion of some cities, nevertheless he retained the kingdom.
Titus Munson Coan to the latter's mother, written while a student at Williams College over thirty years ago, and fortunately preserved by her.
The great judge's head--seamed and vertical forehead, iron mouth, and pike-like under-jaw, all set on that thick neck rising out of the white flannelled collar--was thrown against the puckered green silk of the organ-front as it might have been a cameo of Titus.
She trotted forth to raise a typhoon off the cook-house, and almost on her shadow rolled in the Babu, robed as to the shoulders like a Roman emperor, jowled like Titus, bare-headed, with new patent- leather shoes, in highest condition of fat, exuding joy and salutations.
Martial put me much in mind of Archilochus - and Titus Livius was positively Polybius and none other.
But this holds not always: for Augustus Caesar, Titus Vespasianus, Philip le Belle of France, Edward the Fourth of England, Alcibiades of Athens, Ismael the Sophy of Persia, were all high and great spirits; and yet the most beautiful men of their times.
He loved Paul of Tarsus, liked St John, hated St James as much as he dared, and regarded with mixed feelings Timothy, Titus, and Philemon.
They say--do these hoary traditions--that when Titus sacked Jerusalem and slaughtered eleven hundred thousand Jews in her streets and by-ways, the Wandering Jew was seen always in the thickest of the fight, and that when battle-axes gleamed in the air, he bowed his head beneath them; when swords flashed their deadly lightnings, he sprang in their way; he bared his breast to whizzing javelins, to hissing arrows, to any and to every weapon that promised death and forgetfulness, and rest.
Titus Andronicus; Romeo and Juliet; Julius Caesar; Hamlet; King Lear; Macbeth; Timon of Athens; Antony and Cleopatra; Coriolanus.
The monstrous fiction of a 'Popish Plot,' brought forward by Titus Oates, and the murderous frenzy which it produced, were demonstrations of the strength of the Protestant feeling, and the leader of the Whigs, the Earl of Shaftesbury, proposed that the Duke of York should be excluded by law from the succession to the throne in favor of the Duke of Monmouth, one of the king's illegitimate sons.