churinga

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churinga

(tʃəˈrɪŋɡə)
n, pl -ga or -gas
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a sacred amulet of the native Australians
[from a native Australian language]
References in periodicals archive ?
Sagen und Marchen des Loritja-Stammes, die Totemistischen Vorstellungen und die Tjurunga der Aranda und Loritja.
77) The documents relating to the suppression of the Sydney Benedictines are now missing from SAA, but see Terence Kavenagh, 'Vaughan and the Monks of Sydney', Tjurunga, 25 (1983), pp.
We all got together and made a decision to collect the sacred objects, tjurunga, made from rock and wood; and we said, 'let's build a museum'.
18) Constant Mews, 'Seeing is Believing: Hildegard of Bingen and the Life of Jutta', Tjurunga 51 (1996), 9-40 (pp.
Until 1971, these elders had practiced their pictorial skills in temporary ceremonial sand paintings, and on sacred tjurunga boards.
A tjurunga (sacred object linked to the Dreaming) had been chipped but it was not permitted to smooth the edge "because the tjurunga was regarded as the now-changed body of the ancestral spirit.
This atua njaltja has always stayed around in the company of the tjurunga: for he is the constant guardian of the tjurunga.
Moreover, when elderly Aranda men allowed their tjurunga to pass into Strehlow's hands in return for rations, it may not have been, as Strehlow imagined, because they were sceptical of their sons' ability to safeguard these Dreamings or in despair at what the future held, but a pragmatic recognition that the hunting and gathering economy of which the tjurunga were such a vital part was no longer their main source of sustenance.
the whole of his [Arrernte creator being] journey is a constant straining towards reunion--as if the whole environment represented by the tjurunga is a mother to man (Roheim, 1945), with the path towards it presenting itself as a track made by phallic striving (Munn, 1973:194,200).
Earlier spelt as churinga (Spencer and Gillen 1899:123) and tjurunga as in Strehlow (1970:102).
The object of the scene depicted is to establish the fact that Cowan was in the presence of an event that mirrors the popularly accepted image of Aboriginality: two scantily dressed, bearded old men squatting on a sacred site with their Tjurunga before them, chanting and tapping out a clap-stick rhythm.