To break

References in classic literature ?
From the end of the branch to the ground it must have been seventy feet, and nothing intervened to break a fall.
The son strained and strained, but with all his efforts was unable to break the Bundle.
O my brethren, when I enjoined you to break up the good, and the tables of the good, then only did I embark man on his high seas.
And now having got so far, my master went on to break me to harness; there were more new things to wear.
Now if any one wants to break in a young horse well, that is the way.
He therefore whispered in the ear of the justice that he would exceed his authority by committing the girl to Bridewell, as there had been no attempt to break the peace; "for I am afraid, sir," says he, "you cannot legally commit any one to Bridewell only for ill-breeding.
Those that went with Hector and Polydamas were the bravest and most in number, and the most determined to break through the wall and fight at the ships.
While they were busy stripping the armour from these heroes, the youths who were led on by Polydamas and Hector (and these were the greater part and the most valiant of those that were trying to break through the wall and fire the ships) were still standing by the trench, uncertain what they should do; for they had seen a sign from heaven when they had essayed to cross it--a soaring eagle that flew skirting the left wing of their host, with a monstrous blood-red snake in its talons still alive and struggling to escape.
There are conditions under which an effort to break it may have some chance -- that is, some small, some trifling chance -- of success.
In such cases one horse frightens another, until all are alarmed, and struggle to break loose.
If, seized by an intolerable boredom, he had determined to be a painter merely to break with irksome ties, it would have been comprehensible, and commonplace; but commonplace is precisely what I felt he was not.
Man's desire for the approval of his fellows is so strong, his dread of their censure so violent, that he himself has brought his enemy within his gates; and it keeps watch over him, vigilant always in the interests of its master to crush any half-formed desire to break away from the herd.