toxin

(redirected from Toxins)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Toxins: bacterial toxins

tox·in

 (tŏk′sĭn)
n.
1. A poisonous substance, especially a protein, that is produced by living cells or organisms and is capable of causing disease when introduced into the body tissues but is often also capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies or antitoxins.
2. A poisonous or harmful nonbiological substance, such as a pollutant.

toxin

(ˈtɒksɪn)
n
1. (Pathology) any of various poisonous substances produced by microorganisms that stimulate the production of neutralizing substances (antitoxins) in the body. See also endotoxin, exotoxin
2. (Biology) any other poisonous substance of plant or animal origin

tox•in

(ˈtɒk sɪn)

n.
any poison produced by an organism, including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom.
[1885–90; tox (ic) + -in1]
syn: See poison.

tox·in

(tŏk′sĭn)
A poisonous substance produced by a living organism. Toxins can be products of ordinary metabolism (such as lactic acid), can be produced to kill or immobilize prey (such as the toxins in snake venom), or can be produced for self-defense (such as the cyanide produced by several plants). Toxins produced by bacteria cause disease.

toxin

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.toxin - a poisonous substance produced during the metabolism and growth of certain microorganisms and some higher plant and animal speciestoxin - a poisonous substance produced during the metabolism and growth of certain microorganisms and some higher plant and animal species
ricin, ricin toxin - a toxic protein extracted from castor beans; used as a chemical reagent; can be used as a bioweapon; "one milligram of ricin can kill an adult"
poison, poisonous substance, toxicant - any substance that causes injury or illness or death of a living organism
animal toxin, zootoxin - a toxin resembling bacterial toxins in its antigenic properties that is found in the fluids of certain animals
bacterial toxin - any endotoxin or exotoxin formed in or elaborated by bacterial cells
cytotoxin - any substance that has a toxic effect on cells
endotoxin - a toxin that is confined inside the microorganisms and is released only when the microorganisms are broken down or die
exotoxin - a toxin that is secreted by microorganisms into the surrounding medium
hepatotoxin - any toxin that affects the liver
nephrotoxin - any toxin that affects the kidneys
neurolysin, neurotoxin - any toxin that affects neural tissues
phytotoxin, plant toxin - any substance produced by plants that is similar in its properties to extracellular bacterial toxin

toxin

noun poison, venom Tests showed increased levels of toxins in fish.

toxin

noun
Anything that is injurious, destructive, or fatal:
Translations
méreg
toxin

toxin

[ˈtɒksɪn] Ntoxina f

toxin

[ˈtɒksɪn] ntoxine f

toxin

nGiftstoff m, → Toxin nt

toxin

[ˈtɒksɪn] ntossina

tox·in

n. toxina, veneno, sustancia nociva de origen animal o vegetal;
bacterial ______ bacteriana.

toxin

n toxina
References in periodicals archive ?
One issue that limits widespread testing of foods for toxins that cause food poisoning is the cost of equipment.
Botulinum Toxins - A Wonder Drug or Bio-terror Threat?
A small protein active in the human immune response can disable bacterial toxins by exploiting a property that makes the toxins effective--but also turns out to be a weakness.
Toxoid vaccines protect against a toxin or set of toxins, rather than the organism that produces the toxin(s).
ABSTRACT The presence of the lipophilic toxins okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-1, pectenotoxin-2, and yessotoxin (YTX) in the abalone Haliotis discus hannai collected between March 2009 and May 2010 was analyzed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and the mouse bioassay.
Only toxin-producing C diff strains cause disease and toxins A and B (encoded by the tcdA and tcdB genes) appear to play important roles.
It probably produces toxins to kill the organism that it is invading," says John Mark Carter, chemist and leader of the Albany research team.
Understanding the mechanisms and pathways that toxins use is "of fundamental importance," comments Giampietro Schiavo, of Cancer Research UK in London, who studies a related toxin that causes tetanus and also travels in the body via nerve cells.
This strain is classified as ribotype 027, toxinotype III, and possesses genes encoding toxins A, B, and CDT (binary toxin) as well as a deletion in the tcdC gene, which is believed to increase virulence (2).
How does the Aplysia californica store predator-harming toxins in its body without harming itself?
The organ of the body most affected by toxins of any kind is the liver, whose job it is to filter toxins from what is consumed.
However, people have also suffered asthma-like symptoms after inhaling minute amounts of algal toxins that were aerosolized by waves.