negotiable

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ne·go·tia·ble

 (nĭ-gō′shə-bəl, -shē-ə-)
adj.
1. Capable of being discussed in an effort to reach an agreement: negotiable demands.
2. Capable of being traveled over or through; passable: a negotiable road.
3.
a. Transferable from one person to another: negotiable securities.
b. Transferable from one person to another by means of endorsement: checks and other negotiable instruments.

ne·go′tia·bil′i·ty n.
ne·go′tia·bly adv.

negotiable

(nɪˈɡəʊʃəbəl)
adj
1. able to be negotiated
2. (Banking & Finance) (of a bill of exchange, promissory note, etc) legally transferable in title from one party to another
neˌgotiaˈbility n

ne•go•ti•a•ble

(nɪˈgoʊ ʃi ə bəl, -ʃə bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being negotiated.
2. (esp. of securities) transferable by delivery, with or without endorsement, the title then passing to the transferee.
[1750–60]
ne•go`ti•a•bil′i•ty, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.negotiable - capable of being passed or negotiated; "a negotiable road"
passable - able to be passed or traversed or crossed; "the road is passable"
2.negotiable - able to be negotiated or arranged by compromise; "negotiable demands"; "the proposal is still on the table"
flexible - capable of being changed; "flexible schedules"
3.negotiable - legally transferable to the ownership of anothernegotiable - legally transferable to the ownership of another; "negotiable bonds"
alienable - transferable to another owner

negotiable

adjective
1. debatable, flexible, unsettled, undecided, open to discussion, discussable or discussible The manor is for sale at a negotiable price.
2. valid, transferable, transactional The bonds may no longer be negotiable
3. passable, open, clear, navigable, unobstructed, traversable, crossable Parts of the road had been washed away, but it was still negotiable.

negotiable

adjective
Capable of being passed, traversed, or crossed:
Translations
verhandlungsfähig

negotiable

[nɪˈgəʊʃɪəbl]
A. ADJ
1. (Comm) → negociable
this is our position and it is not negotiableesta es nuestra postura y no es negociable
2. [road etc] → transitable; [river] → salvable
B. CPD negotiable instrument Ninstrumento m negociable

negotiable

[nɪˈgəʊʃəbəl] adj
[price, terms] → négociable
not negotiable [cheque] → non endossable
(= passable) [road] → praticable

negotiable

adj
(Comm) (= can be sold)verkäuflich, veräußerlich; (= can be transferred)übertragbar; not negotiablenicht verkäuflich/übertragbar
these terms are negotiableüber diese Bedingungen kann verhandelt werden
roadbefahrbar; river, mountain, passpassierbar; obstacle, difficultyüberwindbar

negotiable

[nɪˈgəʊʃɪəbl] adj
a. (Comm) → negoziabile; (cheque) → trasferibile
not negotiable → non trasferibile
b. (road) → transitabile; (river) → navigabile; (hill) → valicabile
References in periodicals archive ?
A lower New Zealand dollar would help rebalance the growth outlook towards the tradables sector.
7) Genevieve Knight and Leanne Johnson, "Tradables: developing output and price measures for Australia's tradable and nontradable sectors," Working Paper 97/1 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, December 1997), http://www.
The high exchange rate remains a headwind to the tradables sector, and along with low import price inflation has been holding down tradables inflation.
Given the prospect of slowing employment growth in nontradables and rising competitive pressure on tradables, major employment problems in the near future are a certainty.
Since Spence argues that global supply chains are the reason for the increase in value added per worker in tradables, he holds globalization responsible for rising income inequality in the United States.
tradable goods), not to exceed a fraction of income composed of tradables and non-tradables, as in Mendoza (2002).
Asterisks denote tradables offered by both economies.
The paper argues that the level of and changes in the prices of tradables may be attributable to differences in the quality or variety of goods that are produced and consumed in the catching-up economy.
He also demonstrates that the presence of nominal rigidities and frictions in capital accumulation help to explain the appreciation of the external real exchange rate and the slow adjustment of the relative price of non-tradables to tradables.
The Balassa-Samuelson effect reflects the rise in the relative price of non-tradables because of lower labor productivity gains in this sector compared with the tradable sector.
He found that the nations that had high prices for their tradables relative to their nontradables had low rates of growth in their gross domestic product.