Trans-Jordanian

Trans-Jordanian

adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to the former Trans-Jordan (now Jordan) or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to the former Trans-Jordan (now Jordan) or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Trans-Jordan
References in periodicals archive ?
The respectable magazine amputated the history of the region, for example in 1946, when Palestine was first divided with the establishment of the Trans-Jordanian Emirate, now known as Jordan (77% of Mandatory Palestine).
The Trans-Jordanian Arab Legion, led by British officers was relatively the most effective force for its success in the battle for Old Jerusalem City despite its failure to defend other major cities and Arab population centers.
An exception is the division of Cis- and Trans-Jordanian names into separate sections.
Although the book focuses on the land of the Bible, it rightly construes that region widely, examining materials from southern Syria to the north, the Negev and Sinai to the south, and the ancient trans-Jordanian kingdoms to the east as well as relevant parallels from ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt.
When the Trans-Jordanian Legion captured the eastern side of Jerusalem in 1948, all Jewish property was transferred to the Jordanian Custodian of Enemy Property Office.
However, a trans-Jordanian right-wing "nationalist" movement has begun to crystalise and is likely to undermine what the king calls the embodiment of national unity.
The Bible supplies the basic evidence for the history of the Aramaic sphere and the Trans-Jordanian states, as well as that of the Philistines (surveyed by M.
Since the September accord, many so-called "likudnik" Trans-Jordanian nationalists have been making noises about the obligatory return to the West Bank and Gaza of all but 15% Jordanians of Palestinian origin.
Were certain south Trans-jordanian polities still capable of military resistence as late as the 550s?
The basic fear of many Trans-Jordanians is that most of the Palestinians who are Jordanian nationals will stay in Jordan, eventually achieve an equal political footing with their Trans-Jordanian brethren and run the country.
The king and the government were reacting largely to fears of Trans-Jordanians (Jordanians of non-Palestinian origin) who were making noises about not one but two Palestinian states.
Gerrymandering has guided the division of electoral districts which heavily over-represent bedouins, minorities and Trans-Jordanians.