transcendentalism

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tran·scen·den·tal·ism

 (trăn′sĕn-dĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Transcendentalism A literary and philosophical movement arising in 19th-century New England, associated with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller and asserting the existence of an ideal spiritual reality that transcends empirical and scientific reality and is knowable through intuition.
2. The quality or state of being transcendental.

tran′scen·den′tal·ist n.

transcendentalism

(ˌtrænsɛnˈdɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy)
a. any system of philosophy, esp that of Kant, holding that the key to knowledge of the nature of reality lies in the critical examination of the processes of reason on which depends the nature of experience
b. any system of philosophy, esp that of Emerson, that emphasizes intuition as a means to knowledge or the importance of the search for the divine
2. (Philosophy) vague philosophical speculation
3. the state of being transcendental
4. something, such as thought or language, that is transcendental
ˌtranscenˈdentalist n, adj

tran•scen•den•tal•ism

(ˌtræn sɛnˈdɛn tlˌɪz əm, -sən-)

n.
1. transcendental character, thought, or language.
2. Also called transcenden′tal philos′ophy. any philosophy based upon the doctrine that the principles of reality are to be discovered by the study of the processes of thought, or a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical: in the U.S., associated with Emerson.
[1795–1805; < German Transcendentalismus. See transcendental, -ism]
tran`scen•den′tal•ist, n., adj.

transcendentalism

1. any philosophy based upon the doctrine that the principles of reality are to be discovered only through the analysis of the processes of thought, as Kantianism.
2. a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical, as the philosophy of Emerson. Cf. descendentalism.transcendentalist, n.transcendentalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transcendentalism - any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and materialtranscendentalism - any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
Translations

transcendentalism

[ˈtrænsenˈdentlɪzəm] Ntrascendentalismo m

transcendentalism

ntranszendentale Philosophie, Transzendentalismus m
References in classic literature ?
Not deriving much comfort from this elucidation, I pursued the inquiry still further, and found that the Transcendentalists are followers of my friend Mr.
I bedewed his grave with my tears, worked a bar sinister on his family escutcheon, and, for the general expenses of his funeral, sent in my very moderate bill to the transcendentalists.
His main interest, however, was now in philosophy; perhaps no Englishman has ever had a more profoundly philosophical mind; and through scattered writings and through his stimulating though prolix talks to friends and disciples he performed a very great service to English thought by introducing the viewpoint and ideas of the German transcendentalists, such as Kant, Schelling, and Fichte.
As a writer, he seems to occupy an unfortunate position between the Transcendentalists (who, under one name or another, have their share in all the current literature of the world) and the great body of pen-and-ink men who address the intellect and sympathies of the multitude.
This work analyzes writing and speeches by six 19th-century figures commonly considered American Transcendentalists, including Sampson Reed, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau.
I was reminded of this during a recent trip to New England, where I explore the trail of transcendentalists (beginning in Concord, Massachusetts at the intersection of Walden and Thoreau Streets), connecting with the natural world both inside and outside in celebration of Henry David Thoreau's bicentennial birthday.
Cultural exchanges between the East and West began in the early decades of the nineteenth century as American transcendentalists explored Eastern philosophies and arts.
The first part of the book is really an introduction to, and survey of, anarchist ideas and movements, which provides the basis for Vodovnik's comparisons between anarchist 'politics' and the 'infrapolitics' of the Transcendentalists (primarily Walt Whitman, R.
Insofar as she figured into standard histories, she popped up as a minor figure among the Transcendentalists, embodying the most egotistical, eccentric, and ethereal caricatures of that movement.
Wenke points out that the author may have been without cohort in his political beliefs, and his spiritual autonomy is directly influenced by nineteenth-century Transcendentalists.
Although his mystical Transcendentalism may at times appear to be a hammer blow to fundamental Christian beliefs, he and the other Transcendentalists (devout Unitarians one and all) were "Puritan to the core" (Goddard qtd.
Akin to the occasionally wandering writings of the Transcendentalists, there is much to admire in Smart's treatment of the material, but there is only so much he can do with it.