Transnistria

(redirected from Transdniestr)
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Trans·nis·tri·a

 (trăns-nē′strē-ə)
A region of Moldova east of the Dniester River bordering on Ukraine. Following Moldovan independence from the USSR in 1991, Transnistria unilaterally seceded from Moldova, establishing a de facto independent state.
Translations
Приднестровие
Transnístria
Podněstří
Transnistrien
ĈednestrioTransdnestrioTransnistrio
Transnistria
Transnistria
Transnistria
TransnistrieTransdniestrie
טרנסניסטריה
Pridnjestrovska Moldavska Republika
Dnyeszter-menti Moldáv Köztársaság
Transnistria
Transnistria
沿ドニエストル共和国
트란스니스트리아
Padniestrė
Piedņestras Moldāvu Republika
Trans-Nistrië
Transnistria
Naddniestrze
Transnístria
Transnistria
Podnestersko
Придњестровље
Transnistrien
Придністров'я
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References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of Russian Cossacks from the Transdniestr frozen conflict and Northern Caucasus, two regions plagued by inter-ethnic violence since the 1990s, stoked conflict in the Crimea.
Moldova had previously accumulated obligations on gas supplied to the ethnic Russian enclave of Transdniestr - which usually receives heavy support from Moscow.
Breedlove said potential new targets for Russia included a land corridor linking Crimea and mainland Russia, the strategic Odessa port and the breakaway Russian-speaking region of Transdniestr in Moldova.
Putin also told Obama that the problems surrounding the breakaway Moldovan region of Transdniestr A'- a Russian-speaking region seen by some as the Kremlin's next target -- should be solved not by force but by talks in the "5+2" format of Moldova, Transdniestr, the OSCE, Russia and Ukraine, with the EU and US as observers.
Moscow's annexation of the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea sparked fears it would target other heavily Russian-speaking areas in eastern Ukraine and the Moscow-backed separatist territory of Transdniestr in Moldova.
Putin also told Obama that the problems surrounding the breakaway Moldovan region of Transdniestr -- a Russian-speaking region seen by some as the Kremlin's next target -- should be solved not by force but by talks in the "5+2" format of Moldova, Transdniestr, the OSCE, Russia and Ukraine, with the EU and US as observers.
Missile Shield," Agence France Presse, February 14, 2010; "Russia's NATO Envoy Quashes Transdniestr Missiles Bid--Report," Dow Jones International Press, February 16, 2010; "U.
Moldova has the Transdniestr problem, Ukraine cannot choose between pro-