international law

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international law

n.
The set of laws that govern relations between countries, as established by custom and agreement. Also called law of nations.

international law

n
(Law) the body of rules generally recognized by civilized nations as governing their conduct towards each other and towards each other's subjects

in′terna′tional law′


n.
the body of rules that nations generally recognize as binding in their conduct toward one another.
[1830–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.international law - the body of laws governing relations between nations
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
admiralty law, marine law, maritime law - the branch of international law that deals with territorial and international waters or with shipping or with ocean fishery etc.
civil law - the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
Translations

international law

nVölkerrecht nt, → internationales Recht
References in periodicals archive ?
Nieland received his Juris Doctorate from the College of Law at the University of Iowa and served as a distinguished editor of its international law journal, Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems.
The attending boom in research on transnational law has significantly contributed to our understanding of its structure and functioning.
26) an emerging market for transnational law, (27) and an evolving
Math Noortman, professor in transnational law and non-state actors at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations said: "Talking to terrorists is not about negotiations or moral righteousness, nor is it about empathy or denying criminal accountability.
43) This switch in perspective further cements the value of human dignity to transnational law as its quintessential precondition--and thus permits the rather startling proposition that without human dignity transnational law simply ceases to exist.
Dismantling "the homogeneity and coerciveness of nationalist rules and regulations" (129), Mendenhall describes transnational law as "the pluralistic order of various principles and rules from divergent customs, cultures, and communities that draws its lexicon from competing philosophical discourses and not from top-down, coercive commands of states or sovereigns" (131).
Lerner has led the design of such award-winning academic, medical, and research projects for KPF as the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business, CUNY's Advanced Science Research Center, Peking University's School of Transnational Law in Shenzhen and NYU Shanghai.
They have been organized into sections that problematize and develop the concept of transnational law; explore the legal consequences of specific technological and scientific developments; analyze hybridization within regulatory networks; analyze horizontal hybridization in relation to the public/private distinction; and explore the consequences of this double hybridization for conflicts of law and constitutional approaches to transnational law in relation to custom, conflict of laws, and constitutionalism.
This framework seeks to induce particular reifications of social life--such as the renegotiation of public and private proprietary spheres--and to standardize them globally, prompting Bhupinder Chimni to describe transnational law as a groundwork for the materialization of a global state.
The School's focus on transnational law - applying law across jurisdictions - positions us well to respond to the needs of employers.
JESSUP, TRANSNATIONAL LAW (1956) (reprinting the author's Storrs Lectures, delivered at Yale Law School in February 1956) (coining the term "transnational law" and arguing that the world needed a field of law in this area).

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