tree line

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tree line

or tree·line (trē′līn′)

tree line

n
(Physical Geography) the zone, at high altitudes or high latitudes, beyond which no trees grow. Trees growing between the timberline and the tree line are typically stunted

tim•ber•line

(ˈtɪm bərˌlaɪn)

n.
1. the altitude above sea level at which timber ceases to grow.
2. the arctic or antarctic limit of tree growth.

tree line

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tree line - line marking the upper limit of tree growth in mountains or northern latitudestree line - line marking the upper limit of tree growth in mountains or northern latitudes
line - a spatial location defined by a real or imaginary unidimensional extent
Translations
الإرتِفاع الأقْصى للشَّجَرَه
výšková hranice růstu stromů
trægrænse
lombkorona magassága
hranica lesa
ağaç büyüme üst sınırı

tree line

[ˈtriːlaɪn] Nlímite m forestal

tree line

nlimite m della vegetazione ad alto fusto

tree

(triː) noun
the largest kind of plant, with a thick, firm, wooden stem and branches. We have three apple trees growing in our garden.
ˈtreetop noun
the top of a tree. the birds in the treetops.
ˈtree-trunk noun
the trunk of a tree.
ˈtree line noun
the height above which trees cannot grow.
References in classic literature ?
In her mind's eye she could see the straining naked forms of black men bending rhythmically to the work, and somewhere on that strange deck she knew was the inevitable master-man, conning the vessel in to its anchorage, peering at the dim tree-line of the shore, judging the deceitful night-distances, feeling on his cheek the first fans of the land breeze that was even then beginning to blow, weighing, thinking, measuring, gauging the score or more of ever- shifting forces, through which, by which, and in spite of which he directed the steady equilibrium of his course.
Our study sought to examine how plant communities change across the tree-line ecotone of the Mealy Mountains in Labrador, Canada.
Community similarity offers a means to examine the relationship between non-tree community composition and tree-line dynamics.
The sampling of this black spruce, found at 748m elevation (~130 m above the forest limit; sensu Scott, 1995), was part of a larger survey effort exploring patterns of age structure and reproductive potential at the alpine tree-line ecotone (for details see ppsarctic.
The long-term, landscape-level consequences of altering the fire return interval in the tree-line forest are unknown.
The plan creates a park area at 11th Avenue between 39th and 40th street; and with a proposed 9 foot tree-line sidewalk widening, 40th Street will become a pedestrian corridor to the ferry terminal on the adjacent waterfront and ferry terminal.
2001), who modeled potential tree-line advance in northern Alaska, predicted that under plausible climate warming scenarios, it would take many centuries for spruce to cross the Brooks Range and invade the North Slope of Alaska.
Already in the 1930s, Bob Marshall was working on the question of the tree line and tree-line advance in the Koyukuk country of northern Alaska's Brooks Range.
It seems, then, that the process of tree-line change is not as general as one might initially anticipate and that responses to climatic change are mediated by environmental conditions at smaller, more local scales.
In the valley is the Vandans terminal; two intermediate stations at Latschau and Matschwitz cater for changes in direction in the line of the cables (in this system at least, they cannot go round corners), and high up above the tree-line is the Gruneck terminal, from which skiers and summer ramblers disembark for their encounters with the mountains.