optical illusion

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optical illusion

n.
A visually perceived image that is deceptive or misleading.

optical illusion

n
1. an object causing a false visual impression
2. an instance of deception by such an object

il•lu•sion

(ɪˈlu ʒən)

n.
1. something that deceives by producing a false or misleading impression of reality.
2. the state or condition of being deceived; misapprehension.
3. an instance of being deceived.
4. a perception, as of visual stimuli (optical illusion), that represents what is perceived in a way different from the way it is in reality.
5. a delicate tulle of silk or nylon having a cobwebbed appearance, for trimmings, veilings, and the like.
6. Obs. the act of deceiving.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin illūsiō irony, mocking, derivative of illūdere to mock, ridicule =-il -il1 + lūdere to play]
il•lu′sion•al, il•lu′sion•ar`y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.optical illusion - an optical phenomenon that results in a false or deceptive visual impressionoptical illusion - an optical phenomenon that results in a false or deceptive visual impression
apparent motion, apparent movement, motion, movement - an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object; "the cinema relies on apparent motion"; "the succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement"
mirage - an optical illusion in which atmospheric refraction by a layer of hot air distorts or inverts reflections of distant objects
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
Translations
optický klam
optinen harha
optikai csalódás

optical illusion

nillusione f ottica
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists say the slope of the so-called 'Magic Road' is merely a trick of the eye, a harmless optical illusion.
But when the light source was blocked, the rays vanished; they are a trick of the eye and brain.
In an award-winning demo, Zhong-Lin Lu, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at USC, along with USC alumni Emily Knight and Robert Ennis and Arthur Shapiro, associate professor of psychology at American University, showed that curveball's break is, at least in part, a trick of the eye.
Small, vertical ruffles can do wonders for a short figure, elongating it with a trick of the eye.