triffid

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triffid

(ˈtrɪfɪd)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any of a species of fictional plants that supposedly grew to a gigantic size, were capable of moving about, and could kill humans
[from the science fiction novel The Day of the Triffids (1951) by John Wyndham]
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It concerns an unreleased concept album The Day Of The Triffids which he now plans to perform in its entirety on the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.
Reminding me somewhat of John Wyndham's 1951 classic The Day of the Triffids, this is a thoroughly enjoyable read and I highly recommend it.
THE puff for the trams has been similar to that of Day of the Triffids - "Tram spotted in daylight".
In the classic book, The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham (1951), the triffids are large, mobile carnivorous plants created by Soviet bioengineering.
She wrote her autobiography aged 14 and is referenced in the famous Rocky Horror Picture Show for her part in The Day of the Triffids.
But with the weeds growing everywhere like a 21st century Day of the Triffids nightmare, I just climbed up and got on with it.
Fake flowers have come a long way from the dodgy plastic bunches that looked more like Day of the Triffids than bountiful blooms.
But I choose these two counterexamples from the 1950s to demonstrate the continuity of evolutionary fears projected onto plants even in milieus that employ the monstrosity of the vegetable to such different ends: John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids (1951) dates to this same decade and demonstrates the persistence of this form of the monster plant into the second half of the 20th century.
It doesn't matter if it's Christmas Day, your birthday or The Day Of The Triffids, you just want to play.
It also recalls the prototype The Day of the Triffids in that the protagonists, by virtue of being down in the subway at the time of attack, remain uniquely unaffected by the biochemical attack.
While a complicated personality, the character leaves us wondering if the events of the past two years or so made enough of an impact on all of us to stop talking about true responsibility and start practicing it--like, say, the riveting conversation between Janette Scott and Kieron Moore in the 1962 film The Day of the Triffids, where they explore irresponsible science gone way wrong.
And what he sees are triffids taking over the world as they kill their victims with a deadly, whip-like poisonous sting, feeding on their rotting carcasses.