lane

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lane

 (lān)
n.
1.
a. A narrow country road.
b. A narrow way or passage between walls, hedges, or fences.
2. A narrow passage, course, or track, especially:
a. A prescribed course for ships or aircraft.
b. A strip delineated on a street or highway to accommodate a single line of vehicles: a breakdown lane; an express lane.
c. Sports One of a set of parallel courses marking the bounds for contestants in a race, especially in swimming or track.
d. Sports A wood-surfaced passageway or alley along which a bowling ball is rolled.
e. Sports An unmarked lengthwise area of a playing field or ice rink viewed as the main playing area for a particular position, such as a wing in soccer.
f. Basketball The rectangular area marked on a court from the end line to the foul line.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

lane

(leɪn)
n
1. (Human Geography)
a. a narrow road or way between buildings, hedges, fences, etc
b. (capital as part of a street name): Drury Lane.
2. (Automotive Engineering)
a. any of the parallel strips into which the carriageway of a major road or motorway is divided
b. any narrow well-defined route or course for ships or aircraft
3. (General Sporting Terms) one of the parallel strips into which a running track or swimming bath is divided for races
4. (Bowls & Bowling) the long strip of wooden flooring down which balls are bowled in a bowling alley
[Old English lane, lanu, of Germanic origin; related to Middle Dutch lāne lane]

lane

(leɪn)
adj
1. lone or alone
2. one's lane on one's lane on one's own

lane1

(leɪn)

n.
1. a narrow way or passage between hedges, fences, walls, or houses.
2. any narrow or well-defined passage, track, channel, or course.
3. a longitudinally defined part of a highway wide enough to accommodate one vehicle, often set off from adjacent lanes by painted lines.
4. a fixed route followed by ocean steamers or airplanes: shipping lanes.
5. (in a running or swimming race) the marked-off space or path within which a competitor must remain.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English, c. Middle Dutch lāne lane]

lane2

(leɪn)
adj.
Scot. lone.

lane

- A narrow, often bucolic, path that lacks a shoulder or median; it can also be a division of a larger road.
See also related terms for shoulder.

lane

path
1. 'lane'

A lane is a narrow road which can be used by vehicles, especially in the country.

A lane is also a part of a main road which is marked by the edge of the road and painted line, or by two painted lines.

The lorry was travelling at 20mph in the slow lane.
2. 'path'

You do not use lane to refer to a strip of ground which people walk along and which vehicles cannot use. The word you use is path or footpath.

Can a landowner keep a bull in a field crossed by a public footpath?

street

roadlane
1. 'street'

A street is a road in a town or large village, usually with houses or other buildings built alongside it.

The two men walked slowly down the street.
They went into the café across the street.
2. 'road'

Road is a very general word for a paved way in a town or between towns. You can use road in almost any context where street is used. For example, you can say 'They walked down the street' or 'They walked down the road'. You can also use road for paved ways in the countryside.

The road to the airport was blocked.
They drove up a steep, twisting mountain road.
3. 'lane'

A lane is a narrow road, usually in the countryside.

There's a cottage at the end of the lane.
He rode his horse down a muddy lane.

A lane is also one of the parts of a large road such as a motorway, which has more than one line of traffic going in each direction.

She accelerated into the fast lane.
Are taxis allowed to use the bus lane?
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lane - a narrow way or roadlane - a narrow way or road      
way - any artifact consisting of a road or path affording passage from one place to another; "he said he was looking for the way out"
2.lane - a well-defined track or path; for e.g. swimmers or lines of traffic
skittle alley, alley, bowling alley - a lane down which a bowling ball is rolled toward pins
free throw lane - a lane on a basketball court extending from the end line to 15 feet in front of the backboard; players may not enter this lane during a free throw
path - a way especially designed for a particular use
sea lane, seaway, ship route, trade route - a lane at sea that is a regularly used route for vessels
traffic lane - a lane of a main road that is defined by painted lines; "that car is in the wrong traffic lane"

lane

noun
2. track, way, road, channel, strip, corridor, alley, aisle The lorry was travelling at 20 mph in the slow lane.
Translations
زُقَاقٌزِقاق، طَريق ضيِّقَهطريق: تُسْتَعْمَل في أسماء الطُّرُقمَسْلَكمَمَر مائي
linkapruhsilniceuliceulička
banesejlrutevej
kaistakuja
cheminvoieligne d’eaurouterue
put
keskeny út
áætlunarleiîakreingata-gata
小道
좁은 길
kelio juosta
ielajoslakurssšķērsielataka
uliţă
úzka ulička
cestaprogauličicavozni pas
filsmal väg
ตรอก
làn đường

lane

[leɪn]
A. N
1. (in country) → camino m
a quiet country laneun tranquilo camino or sendero rural
see also memory B
2. (in town) → callejuela f, callejón m
3. (Aut) → carril m, vía f (LAm)
bus lanecarril de autobuses
to change lanescambiar de carril
cycle lanecarril m bici, carril m de bicicletas
the fast lane (Brit) → el carril de la derecha; (most countries) → el carril de la izquierda
the frenzied pace of life in the fast laneel ritmo de vida frenético de los que viven a tope
"get in lane""incorpórese al carril"
the inside lane (Brit) → el carril de la izquierda; (most countries) → el carril de la derecha
"keep in lane""manténgase en su carril"
the outside lane (Brit) → el carril de la derecha; (most countries) → el carril de la izquierda
traffic was reduced to a single lanese pasó a circular por un solo carril
a three-lane motorwayuna autopista de tres carriles
I'm in the wrong laneno estoy en el carril donde debería estar
4. (Naut) → ruta f
sea laneruta f marítima
shipping laneruta f de navegación
5. (Aer) (also air lane) → corredor m aéreo, ruta f aérea
6. (Sport) → calle f
inside/outside lanecalle f de dentro/de fuera
B. CPD lane closure Ncorte m de carril
there will be lane closures on the M1habrá carriles cortados en la M1
lane markings NPLlíneas fpl divisorias

lane

[ˈleɪn] n
(in country)chemin m
(in town)ruelle f
(marked on the road)voie f
(= line of traffic) → voie f
to change lanes → changer de voie
(in race)couloir m

lane

n (in country) (for walking) → (Feld)weg m; (for driving) → Sträßchen nt; (in town) → Gasse f, → Weg m; (Sport) → Bahn f; (on road) → Spur f; (= shipping lane)Schifffahrtsweg mor -linie f; (= air lane)(Flug)route f, → Luftstraße f; in the left-hand lane (Aut) → in or auf der linken Spur; lane markings (on road) → Spurmarkierungen pl; three-lane (motorway etc)dreispurig; “get in lane„einordnen“

lane

[leɪn] n (in country) → stradina, viottolo; (in town) → stradina, viuzza (Sport, Aut) → corsia
"keep in lane" (Aut) → "divieto di sorpasso"
"get into lane" (Aut) → "immettersi in corsia"
I'm in the wrong lane (Aut) → sono sulla corsia sbagliata
a 3-lane motorway → un'autostrada a 3 corsie

lane

(lein)
1. a narrow road or street. a winding lane.
2. used in the names of certain roads or streets. His address is 12 Penny Lane.
3. a division of a road for one line of traffic. The new motorway has three lanes in each direction.
4. a regular course across the sea taken by ships. a regular shipping lane.

lane

زُقَاقٌ silnice bane Weg πάροδος carril kuja chemin put corsia 小道 좁은 길 landweggetje smal vei ścieżka ruela, vereda переулок smal väg ตรอก dar yol làn đường 小路
References in periodicals archive ?
Georgia is currently investing $1 billion per year in transportation projects to widen interstates, add truck-only lanes and improve trucking routes between ports and interstates so that cargo may move across our state and the Southeast faster, without adding to traffic congestion.
Other objectives include reducing heavy-truck fuel consumption and doubling the capacity of truck-only lanes by forming and maneuvering automated three-truck platoons.
The idea of truck-only lanes has been discussed and reviewed for several years.
For example, DOT is looking at the possibility of improving freight movement through developing truck-only lanes, which are lanes dedicated for trucks that are physically separated from passenger vehicles.
Infrastructure projects include grade separations along the Alameda Corridor so trains and passenger vehicles do not have to slow down at crossings; widening freeways to the Mexican border; and building truck-only lanes on major trade corridors.
The proposal, submitted by a consortium of companies called STAR Solutions, would add four additional truck-only lanes and some general-use lanes at a cost of up to $13 billion.
Toward this end, FHWA researchers are modeling, testing, and demonstrating prototype systems in three areas: (1) improving traffic flow by calculating and communicating speed guidance directly to individual drivers; (2) achieving closer coordination, shorter vehicle separation gaps, and higher effective lane capacities through vehicle-vehicle communication, vehicle-infrastructure communication, and cooperative adaptive cruise control; and (3) improving fuel efficiency of heavy trucks and doubling the capacity of truck-only lanes by forming and maneuvering automated three-truck platoons, which use short following headways to increase fuel efficiency through aerodynamic effects and use less road space.
Among the proposals outlined in the report are truck-only lanes on the 710 and 15 freeways and electric rail lines from Los Angeles' Westside to Ontario International Airport and from the ports to Inland Empire warehouses.
The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) recently posted an online video that demonstrates what truck-only lanes could look like on Interstate 70 (1-70) and how they might operate.
Georgia currently is evaluating three unsolicited proposals: improvements to the I-75/I-575 Northwest Corridor with HOV lanes and truck-only lanes; HOV lanes on GA 400; and HOV and truck-only lanes on the northwest quadrant of I-285 and I-20 west of I-285.
There are growing calls for truck-only lanes going from the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports all the way to the Nevada border.