Tsvetaeva


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Tsve·ta·e·va

 (tsvyĭ-tä′yə-və), Marina Ivanovna 1892-1941.
Russian poet whose work, including Evening Album (1910) and "The Swans' Camp" (published in 1957), is distinctive for its powerful rhythms and lyrical directness.

Tsvetaeva

(tsfɛtəˈjeɪvə)
n
(Biography) Marina (Ivanovna). 1892–1941, Russian poet. Opposed to the Revolution, she left Russia (1922) and lived in Paris: when she returned (1939) her husband was shot and she committed suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
68 (the author takes the words "The Body of Thoughts" in the title from the Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva, see p.
This book contains an essay, written in letter form from Tsvetaeva to American Natalie Clifford Barney, that captures a snapshot of the tragic poet's life and ideas less than ten years before her tragic death.
Is there a single poet who isn't influenced by poets from other languages, poets they read in translation, such as Rilke, Cavafy and Celan, Milosz, Herbert, and Szymborska, Akhmatova, Tsvetaeva, and Mandelstam, who believed that poetry is a form of recognition and that poets of all ages echo each other?
Address : The Russian Federation, 302020, Orel, Orel g, Tsvetaeva, 15
After completing her studies, she served as an editor on The Soviet Encyclopaedia, and later worked at the Marina Tsvetaeva Museum.
Llawer yn dyfynnu Waldo wrth gwrs ac eraill yn troi at feirdd fel Marina Tsvetaeva, ei hun wedi dianc i Baris am gyfnod o Rwsia ac yn ysgrifennu am Baris gan ddweud ei fod yn ' drist a dieithr'.
Flynn delves into the material borrowed from Maria Tsvetaeva and Osip Mandelstam in On Ballycastle Beach (1988) uncovered by Shane Alcobia-Murphy, pointing out that the source texts, rather than serving as some kind of secret code that explains the poem, actually highlight the folly of attempting to interpret a poem this way.
Two of the top figures were Marina Tsvetaeva and Anna Akhamtova.
He was also lauded for his superbly skillful, sensitive translations of the poetry of four of the most important Russian poets of the twentieth century, Brodsky, Pasternak, Akhmatova, and Tsvetaeva.
Mandelstam Mayakovsky Pasternak Bulgakov Tsvetaeva Yevtushenko Voznesensky and all the disappeared who could have been Requiem 1930-1940 In the endless silence of the prison yard the nearly endless silence I am recognized.
We have here four Russian female poets, all of them alive and writing today, which means that their understanding of life in a Communist state is largely derived from history or from family stories; they have not suffered the trials and abasements of Anna Akhmatova, Marina Tsvetaeva, or Osip Mandelstam.
Another bonus: each chapter is introduced by a vivid poem by Marina Tsvetaeva, described as "one of the greatest Russian lyrical poets of the twentieth Century", whose verses set the tone for each new development, as in Chapter 8: "After this sleepless night, I'm awash in lightness,/Poised and serene--a star in the Milky Way.