Turk


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Related to Turk: Turck

Turk

 (tûrk)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Turkey.
2. A member of the principal ethnic group of modern-day Turkey or, formerly, of the Ottoman Empire.
3. A member of any of the Turkic-speaking peoples.

[Middle English, from Old French turc, from Turkish Türk; akin to Old Turkic türk, perhaps from türk, ripe, vigorous, strong.]

Turk

(tɜːk)
n
1. (Peoples) a native, inhabitant, or citizen of Turkey
2. (Peoples) a native speaker of any Turkic language, such as an inhabitant of Turkmenistan or Kyrgyzstan
3. obsolete derogatory a violent, brutal, or domineering person

Turk

(tɜrk)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Turkey.
2. a Turkish-speaking citizen of the Ottoman Empire.
3. a member of any Turkic-speaking people.
4.
a. one of a breed of Turkish horses closely related to the Arabian horse.
b. any Turkish horse.
[1300–50; Middle English « Turkish Türk; compare Medieval Latin Turcus, Medieval Greek Toûrkos]

Turk.

Turkey.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Turk - a native or inhabitant of TurkeyTurk - a native or inhabitant of Turkey  
Republic of Turkey, Turkey - a Eurasian republic in Asia Minor and the Balkans; on the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, the Young Turks, led by Kemal Ataturk, established a republic in 1923
Osmanli, Ottoman, Ottoman Turk - a Turk (especially a Turk who is a member of the tribe of Osman I)
Turki - any member of the peoples speaking a Turkic language
effendi - a former Turkish term of respect; especially for government officials
Translations
Turek
tyrker
turkkilainen
Turčin
török
トルコ人
터키 사람
turk
ชาวตุรกี
người Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ

Turk

[tɜːk] N
1. (from Turkey) → turco/a m/f
2. (fig) (esp Pol) → elemento m alborotador
young Turkjoven reformista mf

Turk

[ˈtɜːrk] nTurc (Turque)m/f

Turk

nTürke m, → Türkin f

Turk

[tɜːk] nturco/a

Turk

تُرْكِيّ Turek tyrker Türke Τούρκος turco turkkilainen Turc Turčin turco トルコ人 터키 사람 Turk tyrker Turek turco турок turk ชาวตุรกี Türk người Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ 土耳其人
References in classic literature ?
In the heavy shadows of a big tree before Doctor Welling's house, he stopped and stood watching half-witted Turk Smollet, who was pushing a wheelbarrow in the road.
that man never breathed, be he Turk or Templar, who held life at lighter rate than I do.
Your worship will take warning as much as I am a Turk," returned Sancho; "but, as you say this mischief might have been avoided if you had believed me, believe me now, and a still greater one will be avoided; for I tell you chivalry is of no account with the Holy Brotherhood, and they don't care two maravedis for all the knights-errant in the world; and I can tell you I fancy I hear their arrows whistling past my ears this minute.
Of old the Hospadars would not repair them, lest the Turk should think that they were preparing to bring in foreign troops, and so hasten the war which was always really at loading point.
This would make his position more secure and durable, as it has made that of the Turk in Greece, who, notwithstanding all the other measures taken by him for holding that state, if he had not settled there, would not have been able to keep it.
Were I to last a thousand years, and rise to the dignity of being the handkerchief that the Grand Turk is said to toss toward his favorite, I could not forget the interest with which I accompanied Adrienne to the door of her little apartment, in the entresol.
Edwards, was a Grecian king, who— no, he was a Turk, or a Persian, who wanted to conquer Greece, just the same as these rascals will overrun our wheat fields, when they come back in the fall.
When facing a disease, if it were personified in a king, he treated the patient as a Turk treats a Moor.
She suffers from her wicked old mother and her Grand Turk of a brother.
Mahmoud's tomb was covered with a black velvet pall, which was elaborately embroidered with silver; it stood within a fancy silver railing; at the sides and corners were silver candlesticks that would weigh more than a hundred pounds, and they supported candles as large as a man's leg; on the top of the sarcophagus was a fez, with a handsome diamond ornament upon it, which an attendant said cost a hundred thousand pounds, and lied like a Turk when he said it.
But now, before the terror of the Turk, driven forth by the fear of slavery and disgrace, these Greek scholars fled.
I have often heard George Mac Turk, Lord Bajazet's eldest son, say that if he had his will when he came to the title, he would do what the sultans do, and clear the estate by chopping off all his younger brothers' heads at once; and so the case is, more or less, with them all.