Turn-out


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Turn´-out`

    (tûrn´out`)
n.1.The act of coming forth; a leaving of houses, shops, etc.; esp., a quitting of employment for the purpose of forcing increase of wages; a strike; - opposed to lockout.
2.A short side track on a railroad, which may be occupied by one train while another is passing on a main track; a shunt; a siding; a switch.
3.That which is prominently brought forward or exhibited; hence, an equipage; as, a man with a showy carriage and horses is said to have a fine turn-out.
4.The aggregate number of persons who have come out, as from their houses, for a special purpose; the number in attendance at a gathering; as, a light turnout for the election.
5.Net quantity of produce yielded.
6.A space alongside a highway where vehicles may stop, esp. for emergency purposes, or to admire the view.
References in periodicals archive ?
The event took place on an afternoon to ensure maximum turn-out.
Less than 28% of the electorate turn-out to vote in the metro-mayor elections.
Further, in 1971, Kamaraj and Rajaji joined hands and campaigned for the elections and Indira Gandhi who had alligned with the DMK then was skeptical about the alliance's victory at the hustings on seeing a huge turn-out for the meeting addressed by Kamaraj and Rajaji.
With a turn-out of between ten and 20 per cent of voters, Cameron seems happy with the results.
We could well see an increased turn-out as a result of some of these schemes, but the odds are that the over-all picture will still see significant numbers deciding not to vote at all,' added Mr Price-Thomas.
Fewer than 48% of the city's 334,664 electors bothered to vote in Thursday's General Election, compared to a national turn-out of 61%.
Just 59 per cent voted in the 2001 general election while in last year's local government elections the turn-out was only 32 per cent.
And the turn-out showed, every bit as powerfully as the response to the first team's glorious Carling Cup win, the passion and joy the Boro faithful feel for their club.
A leading Scots academic also said a high turn-out in the next election is required to keep the BNP on the fringes of the mainstream.
The Swansea council initiative encourages pupils to have a greater say in the running of their school, but also raises awareness of elections at a time when turn-out figures among voters in national polls is at an all-time low.
However, there was a low turn-out in London last year when Ken Livingstone was elected mayor.
At the last local elections, in May this year, voter turn-out was 37 per cent, compared with 53 per cent 10 years ago.