knot

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knot1
top: barrel and figure eight knots
bottom: in wood

knot 1

 (nŏt)
n.
1.
a. A compact intersection of interlaced material, such as cord, ribbon, or rope.
b. A fastening made by tying together lengths of material, such as rope, in a prescribed way.
2. A decorative bow of ribbon, fabric, or braid.
3. A unifying bond, especially a marriage bond.
4. A tight cluster of persons or things: a knot of onlookers.
5. A feeling of tightness: a knot of fear in my stomach.
6. A complex problem.
7.
a. A hard place or lump, especially on a tree, at a point from which a stem or branch grows.
b. The round, often darker cross section of such a lump as it appears on a piece of cut lumber. Also called node.
8. A protuberant growth or swelling in a tissue: a knot in a gland.
9.
a. Nautical A division on a log line used to measure the speed of a ship.
b. Abbr. kn. or kt. A unit of speed, one nautical mile per hour, approximately 1.85 kilometers (1.15 statute miles) per hour.
c. A distance of one nautical mile.
10. Mathematics A closed loop that is embedded in three-dimensional space and that can be intertwined with or tangled in itself, but that cannot intersect itself.
v. knot·ted, knot·ting, knots
v.tr.
1. To tie in or fasten with a knot or knots.
2. To snarl or entangle.
3. To cause to form a knot or knots.
v.intr.
1. To form a knot or knots.
2. To become snarled or entangled.

[Middle English, from Old English cnotta.]
Word History: In nautical usage, knot is a unit of speed, not of distance, and has a built-in meaning of "per hour." A ship is said to travel at ten knots (and not ten knots per hour). Although the knot is defined as one nautical mile per hour, the similarity in sound between knot and nautical mile is entirely coincidental. The unit called the knot originated in a traditional method of measuring the speed of ships in use at least since the 16th century. A long rope was knotted at fixed intervals, wound on a spool, and tied to the end of a large wooden wedge, called the chip log or just log. When the log was thrown into the water, it would remain in roughly the same place where it splashed down. As the ship moved away, the rope would pay out and sailors would count the number of knots in the rope that were paid out over a fixed stretch of time, usually measured with a sand hourglass. Eventually, the calculation of speed using this method was made easier by knotting the rope at intervals of 47 feet and 3 inches and using an hourglass that ran out after 30 seconds. If one knot in the rope was paid out during this time, the ship was said to be moving at one knot, or one nautical mile per hour. Because of adjustments in the standard values of units of measurement over the years, a 28-second interval of time is now used in calculating a ship's speed using a rope in this way, but the basic principle remains the same.

knot 2

 (nŏt)
n.
Either of two migratory sandpipers of the genus Calidris that breed in Arctic regions, especially the red knot.

[Middle English, of Scandinavian origin.]

knot

(nɒt)
n
1. any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a piece of rope, cord, etc, in upon itself, to another piece of rope, or to another object
2. (Knots) a prescribed method of tying a particular knot
3. a tangle, as in hair or string
4. a decorative bow or fastening, as of ribbon or braid
5. a small cluster or huddled group
6. a tie or bond: the marriage knot.
7. a difficult problem
8. (Botany) a protuberance or lump of plant tissues, such as that occurring on the trunks of certain trees
9.
a. a hard mass of wood at the point where a branch joins the trunk of a tree
b. a cross section of this, usually roundish and cross-grained, visible in a piece of timber
10. a sensation of constriction, caused by tension or nervousness: his stomach was tying itself in knots.
11. (Medicine)
a. pathol a lump of vessels or fibres formed in a part, as in a muscle
b. anatomy a protuberance on an organ or part
12. (Units) a unit of speed used by nautical vessels and aircraft, being one nautical mile (about 1.15 statute miles or 1.85 km) per hour
13. (Nautical Terms) one of a number of equally spaced knots on a log line used to indicate the speed of a ship in nautical miles per hour
14. at a rate of knots very fast
15. tie someone in knots to completely perplex or confuse someone
16. tie the knot informal to get married
vb, knots, knotting or knotted
17. (tr) to tie or fasten in a knot
18. to form or cause to form into a knot
19. (tr) to ravel or entangle or become ravelled or entangled
20. (tr) to make (an article or a design) by tying thread in an interlaced pattern of ornamental knots, as in macramé
[Old English cnotta; related to Old High German knoto, Old Norse knūtr]
ˈknotter n
ˈknotless adj
ˈknotˌlike adj

knot

(nɒt)
n
(Animals) a small northern sandpiper, Calidris canutus, with a short bill and grey plumage
[C15: of unknown origin]

knot1

(nɒt)

n., v. knot•ted, knot•ting. n.
1. an interlacing, looping, etc., of a cord, rope, or the like, drawn tight into a knob, for fastening two cords together or a cord to something else.
2. a tangled mass; snarl.
3. an ornamental piece of ribbon or similar material tied or folded upon itself.
4. a group or cluster of persons or things.
5. the hard, cross-grained mass of wood at the place where a branch joins a tree trunk.
6. a part of this mass showing in a piece of lumber.
7. a small lump or swelling.
8. a constriction or cramping, as of a muscle.
9. any of various fungal diseases of trees forming an excrescence or gnarl.
10. an intricate or difficult matter; complicated problem.
11.
a. a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile or about 1.15 statute miles per hour.
b. a unit of 47 feet 3 inches (13.79 m) on a line, marked off in knots, formerly used to measure distance.
c. a nautical mile.
12. a bond or tie: the knot of matrimony.
13. Math. node (def. 6).
v.t.
14. to tie in a knot; form a knot in.
15. to secure or fasten by a knot.
16. to form protuberances or knobs in; make knotty.
v.i.
17. to become tied or tangled in a knot.
18. to form knots or joints.
[before 1000; Middle English knot(te), Old English cnotta, c. Middle Low German knotte, Middle High German knotze knob, knot; akin to Old High German chnoto, Old Norse knūtr knot]
knot′ter, n.
knot′less, adj.

knot2

(nɒt)

n.
either of two large sandpipers, Calidris canutus or C. tenuirostris, that breed in the Arctic and winter in the Southern Hemisphere.
[1425–75; late Middle English; orig. uncertain]

Knot

 a small cluster or group of persons or things.

knot


Past participle: knotted
Gerund: knotting

Imperative
knot
knot
Present
I knot
you knot
he/she/it knots
we knot
you knot
they knot
Preterite
I knotted
you knotted
he/she/it knotted
we knotted
you knotted
they knotted
Present Continuous
I am knotting
you are knotting
he/she/it is knotting
we are knotting
you are knotting
they are knotting
Present Perfect
I have knotted
you have knotted
he/she/it has knotted
we have knotted
you have knotted
they have knotted
Past Continuous
I was knotting
you were knotting
he/she/it was knotting
we were knotting
you were knotting
they were knotting
Past Perfect
I had knotted
you had knotted
he/she/it had knotted
we had knotted
you had knotted
they had knotted
Future
I will knot
you will knot
he/she/it will knot
we will knot
you will knot
they will knot
Future Perfect
I will have knotted
you will have knotted
he/she/it will have knotted
we will have knotted
you will have knotted
they will have knotted
Future Continuous
I will be knotting
you will be knotting
he/she/it will be knotting
we will be knotting
you will be knotting
they will be knotting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been knotting
you have been knotting
he/she/it has been knotting
we have been knotting
you have been knotting
they have been knotting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been knotting
you will have been knotting
he/she/it will have been knotting
we will have been knotting
you will have been knotting
they will have been knotting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been knotting
you had been knotting
he/she/it had been knotting
we had been knotting
you had been knotting
they had been knotting
Conditional
I would knot
you would knot
he/she/it would knot
we would knot
you would knot
they would knot
Past Conditional
I would have knotted
you would have knotted
he/she/it would have knotted
we would have knotted
you would have knotted
they would have knotted

knot

1. (kn) A nautical unit of speed equal to the velocity at which one nautical mile is traveled in one hour. 1 kn = 6076 ft per hour.
2. One nautical mile (1.2 mi) per hour.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knot - a tight cluster of people or things; "a small knot of women listened to his sermon"; "the bird had a knot of feathers forming a crest"
bunch, clump, cluster, clustering - a grouping of a number of similar things; "a bunch of trees"; "a cluster of admirers"
2.knot - any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a rope (or cord) upon itself or to another rope or to another object
barrel knot, blood knot - a knot used for tying fishing leaders together; the ends of the two leaders are wrapped around each other two or three times
bow, bowknot - a knot with two loops and loose ends; used to tie shoelaces
carrick bend - a knot used to connect the ends of two large ropes or hawsers
clove hitch - a knot used to fasten a line temporarily to a post or spar
fastening, holdfast, fastener, fixing - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
figure eight, figure of eight - a knot having the shape of the numeral 8; tied in a rope that has been passed through a hole or pulley and that prevents the rope from coming loose
fisherman's bend - a knot for tying a line to a spar or ring
fisherman's knot, truelove knot, true lover's knot - a knot for tying the ends of two lines together
Gordian knot - an intricate knot tied by Gordius, the king of Phrygia, and cut by the sword of Alexander the Great after he heard that whoever undid it would become ruler of Asia
half hitch - a knot used to fasten a rope temporarily to an object; usually tied double
hawser bend - a knot uniting the ends of two lines
hitch - a knot that can be undone by pulling against the strain that holds it; a temporary knot
loop knot - any of various knots used to make a fixed loop in a rope
love knot, lover's knot, lovers' knot, true lover's knot, true lovers' knot - a stylized or decorative knot used as an emblem of love
overhand knot - a simple small knot (often used as part of other knots)
prolonge knot, sailor's breastplate - a knot in the rope used to drag a gun carriage
sheepshank - a knot for shortening a line
slipknot - a knot at the end of a cord or rope that can slip along the cord or rope around which it is made
square knot - a double knot made of two half hitches and used to join the ends of two cords
stopper knot - a knot that prevents a rope from passing through a hole
surgeon's knot - any of several knots used in tying stitches or ligatures
Turk's head - an ornamental knot that resembles a small turban
3.knot - a hard cross-grained round piece of wood in a board where a branch emerged; "the saw buckled when it hit a knot"
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
plank, board - a stout length of sawn timber; made in a wide variety of sizes and used for many purposes
4.knot - something twisted and tight and swollenknot - something twisted and tight and swollen; "their muscles stood out in knots"; "the old man's fists were two great gnarls"; "his stomach was in knots"
distorted shape, distortion - a shape resulting from distortion
5.knot - a unit of length used in navigation; exactly 1,852 meters; historically based on the distance spanned by one minute of arc in latitude
nautical linear unit - a linear unit of distance used in navigation
6.knot - soft lump or unevenness in a yarn; either an imperfection or created by design
raggedness, roughness - a texture of a surface or edge that is not smooth but is irregular and uneven
7.knot - a sandpiper that breeds in the Arctic and winters in the southern hemisphereknot - a sandpiper that breeds in the Arctic and winters in the southern hemisphere
sandpiper - any of numerous usually small wading birds having a slender bill and piping call; closely related to the plovers
Calidris, genus Calidris - a genus of Scolopacidae
Verb1.knot - make into knots; make knots out of; "She knotted her fingers"
macrame - make knotted patterns; "macrame a plant holder"
2.knot - tie or fasten into a knot; "knot the shoelaces"
tie, bind - fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cord; "They tied their victim to the chair"
3.knot - tangle or complicate; "a ravelled story"
interlace, intertwine, lace, twine, enlace, entwine - spin,wind, or twist together; "intertwine the ribbons"; "Twine the threads into a rope"; "intertwined hearts"
unknot, unpick, unravel, unscramble, untangle - become or cause to become undone by separating the fibers or threads of; "unravel the thread"

knot

noun
1. connection, tie, bond, joint, bow, loop, braid, splice, rosette, ligature One lace had broken and been tied in a knot.
2. group, company, set, band, crowd, pack, squad, circle, crew (informal), gang, mob, clique, assemblage A little knot of men stood clapping.
verb
1. tie, secure, bind, complicate, weave, loop, knit, tether, entangle He knotted the bandanna around his neck.
2. tighten, become tense, tauten, stretch I felt my stomach knot with apprehension.
tie the knot (Informal) get married, marry, wed, espouse, take the plunge (informal), walk down the aisle (informal), get hitched (slang), get spliced (informal), become man and wife, wive (archaic), take to wife, plight your troth (old-fashioned) Len tied the knot with Kate five years ago.

Knots

barrell knot, bend, Blackwall hitch, bow or bowknot, bowline, bowstring knot, carrick bend, cat's paw, clinch knot, clove hitch, diamond knot, Englishman's tie, figure of eight, fisherman's bend, fisherman's or truelover's knot, girth hitch, granny knot, half hitch, hangman's knot, harness hitch, hawser bend, half-hitch, hitch, loop knot, love knot, magnus hitch, Matthew Walker, monkey fist, overhand knot or thumb knot, prusik knot, reef knot, flat knot, or square knot, rolling hitch, running bowline, running knot, sailor's knot, sheepshank, sheet bend, becket bend, weaver's hitch, or mesh knot, shroud knot, slipknot, slippery hitch, stevedore's knot, surgeon's knot, swab hitch, timber hitch, truelove knot, Turk's-head, wale knot, wall knot, water knot, Windsor knot

knot

noun
1. That which unites or binds:
2. A number of individuals making up or considered a unit:
3. Something that is intricately and often bewilderingly complex:
4. A part that protrudes or extends outward:
5. An unevenness or elevation on a surface:
6. A small raised area of skin resulting from a light blow or an insect sting, for example:
verb
To make fast or firmly fixed, as by means of a cord or rope:
Translations
زُمْرَه، مَجْموعَهعُقْدَةٌعُقْدَهعَقْدَه بَحْرِيَّهعُقْدَه في غُصْن الشَّجَره
uzelzauzlovatboulechomáčjespák
knobknudebinde knudeklynge
solmutakkuvaikeuskuhmuongelma
čvor
csomóz
hnúturhnÿta, binda hnúthópur, òyrpingkvistur
ノット結び目
매듭
su mazgaissumegztisurišti mazgu
mezglssasiet mezglāgrupamāzers, koka izaugums
hlúčikzaviazať na uzol
vozelzavozlati
knutknytastekknipaknop
เงื่อน
düğümdüğüm atmakdüğümleyip bağlamakgrupküme
nút thắt

knot

[nɒt]
A. N
1. (gen) → nudo m
to tie a knothacer un nudo
her hair was all in knotstenía el pelo enredado
to tie sb up in knotsenredar a algn
to get tied up or tie o.s. up in knotsarmarse un lío
to tie the knotcasarse
2. (Naut) (= unit of speed) → nudo m
see also rate A2
3. (in wood) → nudo m; (= group) [of people] → grupo m, corrillo m
B. VTanudar, atar
to knot sth togetheranudar algo, atar algo con un nudo
get knotted!¡fastídiate!
C. VIhacerse un nudo

knot

[ˈnɒt]
n
(in string, lace)nœud m
to tie a knot → faire un nœud
One lace had broken and been tied in a knot → Un des lacets s'était rompu et on y avait fait un nœud.
to tie a knot in sth → faire un nœud à qch
to tie the knot (= get married) → convoler en justes noces
to have a knot in one's stomach (because of fear, anxiety)avoir l'estomac noué
to tie o.s. in knots (= get confused) → se mettre dans tous ses états
(= tangle) → nœud m
(in wood, plank)nœud m
(= unit of speed) → nœud m
vtnouer

knot

n
(in string, tie, fig) → Knoten m; (in muscle) → Verspannung f; to tie/undo or untie a knoteinen Knoten machen/aufmachen or lösen; to tie the knot (fig)den Bund fürs Leben schließen; to tie oneself (up) in knots (fig)sich immer mehr verwickeln, sich immer tiefer verstricken; to tie somebody (up) in knotsjdn völlig verwirren; there was a knot in his stomachsein Magen krampfte sich zusammen; a knot of musclesein Muskelbündel nt; the whole matter is full of legal knotsdie ganze Sache ist rechtlich äußerst verwickelt
(Naut: = speed) → Knoten m; to make 20 knots20 Knoten machen ? rate1 N a
(in wood) → Ast m, → Verwachsung f
(= group)Knäuel m; a knot of touristsein Touristenknäuel m
vteinen Knoten machen in (+acc); (= knot together)verknoten, verknüpfen; stomachverkrampfen; to knot something to somethingetw mit etw verknoten; to knot something around somethingetw um etw knoten; get knotted! (Brit inf) → du kannst mich mal! (inf), → rutsch mir den Buckel runter! (inf); I told him to get knotted (inf)ich hab ihm gesagt, er kann mich mal (inf)or er kann mir den Buckel runterrutschen (inf)
visich verknoten, Knoten bilden; (stomach, muscles)sich verkrampfen; (forehead)sich runzeln

knot

[nɒt]
1. n (in rope, wood, also) (Naut) (speed) → nodo; (group, of people) → capannello
to tie a knot → fare un nodo
to tie o.s. up in knots (fig) → ingarbugliarsi
2. vtfare un nodo a, annodare
to knot together → annodare insieme

knot

(not) noun
1. a lump or join made in string, rope etc by twisting the ends together and drawing tight the loops formed. She fastened the string round the parcel, tying it with a knot.
2. a lump in wood at the join between a branch and the trunk. This wood is full of knots.
3. a group or gathering. a small knot of people
4. a measure of speed for ships (about 1.85 km per hour).
verbpast tense, past particple ˈknotted
to tie in a knot. He knotted the rope around the post.
ˈknotty adjective
1. containing knots.
2. (of a problem etc) difficult. a knotty problem.

knot

عُقْدَةٌ uzel knude Knoten κόμπος nudo solmu nœud čvor nodo 結び目 매듭 knoop knute węzeł узел knut เงื่อน düğüm nút thắt

knot

n. nudo;
surgical ______ quirúrgico.

knot

n nudo; knot in my back..nudo en mi espalda
References in periodicals archive ?
It is being said that the actress had sought permission from her daughter before tying the knot with Shivaprasad.
Nurse Louise and Steven are tying the knot on the remote isle of Acklins, which is literally a sun-kissed Caribbean island.
The newlyweds made a phone call home after tying the knot under an arch of flowers.