balance of trade

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balance of trade

n.
The difference in value between the total exports and total imports of a nation during a specific period of time.

balance of trade

n
(Economics) economics the difference in value between total exports and total imports of goods. Also called: visible balance Compare invisible balance

bal′ance of trade′


n.
the difference in value between imports and exports, said to be favorable to a country when exports are greater.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balance of trade - the difference in value over a period of time of a country's imports and exports of merchandisebalance of trade - the difference in value over a period of time of a country's imports and exports of merchandise; "a nation's balance of trade is favorable when its exports exceed its imports"
balance - the difference between the totals of the credit and debit sides of an account
Translations

balance of trade

nbilancia commerciale
References in periodicals archive ?
international investment position from the world's largest creditor country in 1980 to the world's largest debtor in 1990 resulted from a dramatic reversal in the U.
These import barriers would pull workers and capital into import-competing sectors and away from export sectors, roughly leaving the U.
agricultural producers to expand overseas markets that contribute to a positive U.
If the results of this study come to fruition, we could see a substantial impact on U.
dollar on Friday, rising to a fresh one-week high after the release of strong U.
weekly jobless claims remaining high, but investors took cues from the improvement in the U.
To shed some light on this concern, we extended the analyses described above to compare the macroeconomic performance of the foreign industrial economies during periods of U.
Of course, a strengthening of the oil currencies (including not only the Gulf States, but also other Middle East countries and Russia) would not turn around the U.
In addition, GAO found that Ex-Im could clarify how it characterizes the effect of its financing on the U.
The relationship between dollar depreciations and the U.
trade deficit with Mexico in the automotive sector did rise dramatically--almost tripling in the first five years of NAFTA--but the bigger impact on the U.
The EPI stated, "Corporations, politicians and economists repeatedly claimed in the early 1990s that (NAFTA) would improve the U.