ultraviolet

(redirected from UVA radiation)
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Related to UVA radiation: UV A

ul·tra·vi·o·let

 (ŭl′trə-vī′ə-lĭt)
adj. Abbr. UV
1. Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between violet visible light and x-rays in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 790 terahertz and 30 petahertz and wavelengths between 380 nanometers and 10 nanometers.
2. Of or relating to a light bulb that emits ultraviolet radiation.
n.
The ultraviolet range of electromagnetic radiation: Sunburns result from radiation in the ultraviolet.

ultraviolet

(ˌʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt)
n
(General Physics) the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; in the range 0.4 × 10–6 and 1 × 10–8 metres
adj
(General Physics) of, relating to, or consisting of radiation lying in the ultraviolet: ultraviolet radiation. Abbreviation: UV

ul•tra•vi•o•let

(ˌʌl trəˈvaɪ ə lɪt)

adj.
1. pertaining to electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths in the range of approximately 5–400 nm, shorter than visible light but longer than x-rays.
2. pertaining to, producing, or using light having such wavelengths: an ultraviolet lamp. Compare infrared.
n.
3. ultraviolet radiation.
[1870–75]

ul·tra·vi·o·let

(ŭl′trə-vī′ə-lĭt)
Adjective
Relating to electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths shorter than those of visible light but longer than those of x-rays. See more at electromagnetic spectrum.
Noun
Ultraviolet light or the ultraviolet part of the spectrum. See Note at infrared.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ultraviolet - radiation lying in the ultraviolet rangeultraviolet - radiation lying in the ultraviolet range; wave lengths shorter than light but longer than X rays
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
sun-ray, sunray - a ray of artificial ultraviolet light from a sunray lamp
Adj.1.ultraviolet - having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-raysultraviolet - having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; lying outside the visible spectrum at its violet end; "ultraviolet radiation"; "an ultraviolet lamp"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Translations
فَوْق البَنَفْسَجي
ultrafialový
ultraviolet
ultravioletti
ibolyántúli
útfjólublár
ultravioletinis
ultraviolets
ultravioleta
ultrafialový
ultraviolett
mor ötesi

ultraviolet

[ˈʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt]
A. ADJultravioleta inv
B. CPD ultraviolet light Nluz f ultravioleta
ultraviolet radiation Nradiación f ultravioleta
ultraviolet rays NPLrayos mpl ultravioleta
ultraviolet treatment Ntratamiento m de onda ultravioleta

ultraviolet

[ˌʌltrəˈvaɪələt] adj [rays] → ultraviolet(te); [lamp] → à UV

ultraviolet

[ˌʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt] adjultravioletto/a

ultraviolet

(altrəˈvaiəlit) adjective
(of light) consisting of rays from the invisible part of the spectrum beyond the purple, that have an effect on the skin, eg causing suntan.

ul·tra·vi·o·let

a. ultravioleta, que se extiende más allá de la zona violeta del espectro;
___ raysrayos ___;
___ therapyterapia de radiación ___.

ultraviolet

adj ultravioleta
References in periodicals archive ?
6,25) While this helps prevent sunburn, it does nothing to block the UVA radiation that makes up 95% of ultraviolet radiation and causes much greater damage.
Alternate trafficking of cathepsin L in dermal fibroblasts induced by UVA radiation.
The UVA radiation in its chamber at the surface of patient's skin was 4 mW/cm2 and for UVB the radiation was 1.
To conduct the study, researchers measured outside ambient UVA radiation as well as UVA radiation behind the front windshield and behind the driver's side window in 29 vehicles from 15 manufacturers.
SPF protects you from UVB exposure (which causes sunburn), while PA guards against UVA radiation (which causes deeper skin damage).
It was found that windshield filtering properties fell into one of two distinct groups: those windshields which effectively blocked UVA radiation up to 400nm; and those which effectively blocked up to around 350nm but transmitted UVA radiation between 350-400nm.
The ultraviolet radiation spectrum is divided into UVA radiation (315-400 nm), UVB radiation (270-315 nm), and UVC radiation (100-280 nm).
According to the proposed rule, some research has found that "doses of UVA radiation emitted by high-power sunlamp products may be up to 10-15 times higher than that of the midday sun, resulting in an intense amount of exposure that does not exist in nature.
This single ingredient helps filter out sunburn-causing UVB, as well as dermis penetrating UVA radiation, both of which can lead to an increase in the risk of skin cancer, according to the company.
Since the intensity of incoming UVA radiation does not follow a spatial trend, the observed spatial variability may be associated with atmospheric changes, such as decreased cloud cover (promoting increased UVA) or air pollution events (dust storms, wildfires), that promote the scattering of solar radiation by particles (and thus reduced UVA exposures).