umbles

umbles

(ˈʌmbəlz)
pl n
(Cookery) another term for numbles
References in classic literature ?
Wickfield's kind intention to give me my articles, which would otherwise not lay within the umble means of mother and self
Oh no, Master Copperfield,' returned Uriah, shaking his head, 'I am much too umble for that
Mother will be expecting me,' he said, referring to a pale, inexpressive-faced watch in his pocket, 'and getting uneasy; for though we are very umble, Master Copperfield, we are much attached to one another.
belive me to be, sir, ure Onur's umble servant to cumand till deth,
Umbles were considered inferior quality food that were served to the lower classes.
We have taken some of the quirky names of recipes from the original book too, like Rabbit Surprised, Umbles (innards) of Deer and other, frankly, unappetising sounding dishes," said Jenny.
WITH regard to Dave Cooper's comments about "humble pie", surely the correct usage would be "umbles" as it was made from umbles.
When the posh folk of old Northumberland tucked into their roast venison, everyone else made do with the umbles, deer offal, which consists of the entrails, heart and liver.
Umbles are apparently at their best when baked in a pie with beef suet, apples, currants, sugar, salt, nutmeg and pepper.
The G manuscript of Bibbesworth says that the fingernails should be cut down to the agnails with scissors: `Coupes des cysours de umbles les eles' (v.
Georgianna Umbles Home Products is named after the mother-in-law Diane never had a chance to know.
Crow historically would have been an optional ingredient of umble pie, though the meat was probably more often just boiled.