undercurrent

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un·der·cur·rent

 (ŭn′dər-kûr′ənt, -kŭr′-)
n.
1. A current, as of air or water, below another current or beneath a surface.
2. An underlying tendency, force, or influence often contrary to what is superficially evident.

undercurrent

(ˈʌndəˌkʌrənt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a current that is not apparent at the surface or lies beneath another current
2. an opinion, emotion, etc, lying beneath apparent feeling or meaning
Also called: underflow

un•der•cur•rent

(ˈʌn dərˌkɜr ənt, -ˌkʌr-)

n.
1. a hidden tendency or feeling underlying and often at variance with someone's words, actions, etc.
2. a current, as of air or water, that flows below the upper currents or surface.
[1675–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.undercurrent - a subdued emotional quality underlying an utteranceundercurrent - a subdued emotional quality underlying an utterance; implicit meaning
meaning, substance - the idea that is intended; "What is the meaning of this proverb?"
2.undercurrent - a current below the surface of a fluidundercurrent - a current below the surface of a fluid
tide - the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon
sea purse, sea puss, sea-poose, sea-purse, sea-puss, undertow - the seaward undercurrent created after waves have broken on the shore
current, stream - a steady flow of a fluid (usually from natural causes); "the raft floated downstream on the current"; "he felt a stream of air"; "the hose ejected a stream of water"

undercurrent

noun
1. undertone, feeling, atmosphere, sense, suggestion, trend, hint, flavour, tendency, drift, murmur, tenor, aura, tinge, vibes (slang), vibrations, overtone, hidden feeling a deep undercurrent of racism in British society
2. undertow, tideway, riptide, rip, rip current, crosscurrent, underflow He tried to swim after him but the strong undercurrent swept them apart.

undercurrent

noun
A subtle quality underlying or felt to underlie a situation, action, or person:
Translations

undercurrent

[ˈʌndəˌkʌrənt] N (in sea) → corriente f submarina, contracorriente f (fig) (feeling etc) → trasfondo m
an undercurrent of criticismun trasfondo de críticas calladas

undercurrent

[ˈʌndərkʌrənt] n
(in sea, river)courant m sous-marin
(fig) [feeling] → courant m sous-jacent

undercurrent

[ˈʌndəˌkʌrnt] ncorrente f sottomarina (fig) → vena nascosta
References in classic literature ?
She began to look with her own eyes; to see and to apprehend the deeper undercurrents of life.
There were very few resident landlords in the neighborhood and also very few domestic or literate serfs, and in the lives of the peasantry of those parts the mysterious undercurrents in the life of the Russian people, the causes and meaning of which are so baffling to contemporaries, were more clearly and strongly noticeable than among others.
With all his cruel ferocity and coldness there was an undercurrent of something in Tars Tarkas which he seemed ever battling to subdue.
Many of the men were making low-toned noises with their mouths, and these subdued cheers, snarls, imprecations, prayers, made a wild, bar- baric song that went as an undercurrent of sound, strange and chantlike with the resounding chords of the war march.
Irwine's side towards the valley of the Willow Brook, had also certain indistinct anticipations, running as an undercurrent in his mind while he was listening to Mr.
Lastly - and firstly as the undercurrent of all his quick thoughts -this adventure, though he did not know the English word, was a stupendous lark - a delightful continuation of his old flights across the housetops, as well as the fulfilment of sublime prophecy.
But an undercurrent of query continued to run in his mind, as to what had really happened to the boy, and what was the boy's exact definition of being all right.
The undercurrent is terribly strong, and if you once get down into it you are all right.
There is an undercurrent of feeling somewhere," the Prince continued,--"one of the cheaper organs is shrieking all the time a brazen warning.
He concealed his disappointment, and joined so easily with her in her criticism that she did not realize that deep down in him was running a strong undercurrent of disagreement.
But when I heard the chanting and the prayers of those old men, dead to the world and forgotten by the world, I discerned an undercurrent of sublime egoism in the life of the cloister.
Such gruel sustains life here, I thought; so, shutting my eyes, and excluding the motes by a skilfully directed undercurrent, I drank to genuine hospitality the heartiest draught I could.