ungulate

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un·gu·late

 (ŭng′gyə-lĭt, -lāt′)
n.
A hoofed mammal, such as a horse, pig, deer, buffalo, or antelope, belonging to the former order Ungulata, now divided into several orders including Artiodactyla and Perissodactyla.

[Latin ungulātus, from ungula, hoof, diminutive of unguis, nail; see unguis.]

un′gu·late adj.

ungulate

(ˈʌŋɡjʊlɪt; -ˌleɪt)
n
1. (Zoology) any of a large group of mammals all of which have hooves: divided into odd-toed ungulates (perissodactyls) and even-toed ungulates (artiodactyls). See perissodactyl, artiodactyl
2. (Animals) any of a large group of mammals all of which have hooves: divided into odd-toed ungulates (perissodactyls) and even-toed ungulates (artiodactyls). See perissodactyl, artiodactyl
[C19: from Late Latin ungulātus having hooves, from ungula]

un•gu•late

(ˈʌŋ gyə lɪt, -ˌleɪt)

adj.
1. having hoofs.
2. belonging or pertaining to the former order Ungulata, comprising all hoofed mammals, now divided into the odd-toed perissodactyls and the even-toed artiodactyls.
3. hooflike.
n.
4. a hoofed mammal.
[1795–1805; < Late Latin ungulātus hoofed = Latin ungul(a) hoof (ung(uis) (see unguis) + -ula -ule) + -ātus -ate1]

un·gu·late

(ŭng′gyə-lĭt)
A hoofed mammal. There are two kinds of ungulates: those having an even number of toes (artiodactyls) and those having an odd number of toes (perissodactyls).

ungulate

a mammal having hoofs, as the cow, horse, etc. — ungulate, adj.
See also: Animals
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ungulate - any of a number of mammals with hooves that are superficially similar but not necessarily closely related taxonomicallyungulate - any of a number of mammals with hooves that are superficially similar but not necessarily closely related taxonomically
eutherian, eutherian mammal, placental, placental mammal - mammals having a placenta; all mammals except monotremes and marsupials
hoof - the foot of an ungulate mammal
dinocerate - an extinct ungulate
odd-toed ungulate, perissodactyl, perissodactyl mammal - placental mammals having hooves with an odd number of toes on each foot
artiodactyl, artiodactyl mammal, even-toed ungulate - placental mammal having hooves with an even number of functional toes on each foot
cannon, shank - lower part of the leg extending from the hock to the fetlock in hoofed mammals
hock-joint, hock - tarsal joint of the hind leg of hoofed mammals; corresponds to the human ankle
Adj.1.ungulate - having or resembling hoofsungulate - having or resembling hoofs; "horses and other hoofed animals"
unguiculate, unguiculated - having or resembling claws or nails; "unguiculate animals"; "an unguiculate flower petal"
Translations
HuftierUnpaarhufer
kavioeläin
parkljar

ungulate

[ˈʌŋgjʊleɪt]
A. ADJungulado
B. Nungulado m

ungulate

nHuftier nt, → Ungulat m (spec)
adj mammalmit Hufen
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for PROJECT FOR THE CONSERVATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE ALCORNOCAL AFFECTED BY THE HERBIVORY OF UNGULATES IN AREAS OF THE PN DE LOS ALCORNOCALES, PROVINCE OF CDIZ.
The zoo would have animals including birds like parrots, ducks, ostrich, pheasants, besides ungulates I.
Hunting for wild ungulates will continue only 4 months now(August, September, October, November).
Sexual segregation exists in many ungulates (Ruckstuhl and Kokko, 2002; Ruckstuhl and Neuhaus, 2002).
49 times as many ungulates in the summer as in the winter, as more young prey were taken.
Linzey profiles the species by order: opossums; insectivores; bats; pikas, hares, and rabbits; rodents, carnivores; and even-toed ungulates.
The secondary food sources were wild ungulates (in winter and spring; mainly wild boar Sus scrofa, including piglets) and plants (in summer and autumn; mainly wild fruits).
The 6th World Congress on Mountain Ungulates and the 5th International Symposium on Mouflon started in Nicosia on Mondaymorning, with the participation of scientists from over 20 countries, in Nicosia.
Dama dama, Capreolus capreolus, or caribou Rangifer tarandus, allowing for results to be applicable to a broader suite of ungulates.
Intensified herbivory by predator-free ungulates has substantially impacted many forest communities, reducing plant growth and shifting species compositions (Cote et al, 2004; Ripple et al, 2010).
Deputy head keeper of ungulates Lisa Watkins said: "The baby hasn't got horns yet, but these start to develop straight away and can reach almost a metre when fully grown.
Snow Leopard Foundation (SLF) Pakistan has been camera trapping in Terich Valley, which is helping determine the population of snow leopards and other ungulates in the region.