Unilateral Declaration of Independence


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Unilateral Declaration of Independence

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a declaration of independence made by a dependent state without the assent of the protecting state. Abbreviation: UDI
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Compare Hannum, supra note 86, at 68 (finding norm of self-determination as both a shield protecting a state from secession and a spear piercing the veil of sovereignty used to hide undemocratic or unrepresentative regimes), with Written Statement of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Accordance with International Law of the Unilateral Declaration of Independence in Respect of Kosovo, 2010 I.
Following Israel's unilateral declaration of independence in 1948, to satisfy its insatiable expansionist land grab strategy and secure an "absolute Jewish majority", the Zionists assailed, depopulated and occupied further 30pc of the land designated for the future Palestinian state under the UN plan.
Summary: RAMALLAH, West Bank: Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has ruled out a unilateral declaration of independence.
While the Palestinian Authority, to which the PCBS reports, has stepped up efforts to win support for a unilateral declaration of independence, it remains committed to a negotiated agreement with Israel.
When, in July, the International Court of Justice held that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence did not violate international law because international law is silent on the subject of the legality of declarations of independence (meaning that no declarations of independence violate international law and all are "legal, albeit subject to the political decisions of sovereign states to recognize or not the independence declared), the United States responded by calling on all countries which had not already recognized Kosovo to do so promptly.
When, in July, the International Court of Justice held that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence did not violate international law because international law is silent on the subject of the legality of declarations of independence (meaning that no declarations of independence violate international law and all are "legal", albeit subject to the political decisions of sovereign states to recognize or not the independence declared), the United States responded by calling on all countries which had not already recognized Kosovo to do so promptly.
Based upon this provision, the UN General Assembly requested through its Resolution 63/3 (initiated by Serbia and adopted on 8 October 2008) that the ICJ render an advisory opinion on the following question: "Is the unilateral declaration of independence by the Provisional Institutions of Self-Government of Kosovo in accordance with international law?
Reiterating Serbia's stand to never recognise Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence, Jeremic said he hoped the resolution "would help create an atmosphere conducive to the establishment of a comprehensive compact of peace between Serbs and Albanians, achieved through a good faith dialogue".
After the International Court of Justice said that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence was not out of line with international law, Serbia took an ostensibly pragmatic line, vowing to pursue its campaign against Pristina's regime peacefully and at the level of international diplomacy.
Summary: The International Court of Justice's ruling last week that Kosovo did not violate international law with its unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 should send an important message to Moscow and Washington: Stop meddling.
Despite strong opposition from a number of countries, including Russia and China, Kosovar determination for statehood was undeterred, resulting in its unilateral declaration of independence in February 2008.
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