unvariable

unvariable

(ʌnˈvɛərɪəbəl)
adj
archaic invariable; unchangeable or unchanging
References in periodicals archive ?
These levels were found to be significantly lower in line with our findings17 higher6 or unvariable in smokers.
Pekuah does think of retiring to a monastery, but she primarily wishes to "be fixed in some unvariable state"; and even though Nekayah dreams of starting a college for women, it is only because "of all sublunary things, knowledge was the best" (418; my emphasis).
When applied to identity, essentialism refers to "the notion that individual groups have an immutable and discoverable 'essence'--a basic, unvariable, and presocial nature" (Moya, 2000, p.
The latter are considered to be unvariable nationally, but variable at international level.
But perhaps the most potent symbol is that of the ghost: 'the folk song is still there, but a ghostly voice, an unvariable possibility, an unconscious norm.
Pekuah desires to be "fixed in some unvariable state" (like the convent of St.
On the other hand, skilled workers in the distribution, public catering, and personal and domestic service sectors are likely to oppose free-market reforms, because these workers derive significant material benefits from access to goods and services that were virtually unvariable to the typical consumers.