Kekkonen

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Kekkonen

(Finnish ˈkɛkkɔnɛn)
n
(Biography) Urho (ˈurhɔ). (1900–86), Finnish statesman; president (1956–81)
References in periodicals archive ?
Former Finnish president Urho Kekkonen was clearly taken with the place and, in the 1970s, purchased a sturdy pine cabin outside the 300-person village as a private retreat, where powerful guests included Yasser Arafat, Moshe Dayan of Israel, President Ford of the US and King Hussein of Jordan.
Nonetheless, he made a full recovery and in the post-war years, became a moose hunter and dog breeder of some repute, often serving as a guide for Finnish president Urho Kekkonen, who, like many of his fellow Finns, was an ardent hunter and outdoorsman.
Urho kekkonen national park kemihaara: Alexander kopf 2.
The wilderness Urho Kekkonen National Park, a 90- minute flight from Helsinki, is a winter wonderland where you can traverse the frosty landscape on a reindeer- pulled sled, or go cross- country skiing on the SaariselkEn trails.
The treaty laid the basis for the "Paasikivi-Kekkonen line," named after Finnish Presidents Juho Paasikivi and his successor, Urho Kekkonen, which sought above all to keep Finland neutral in international affairs.
Erst mit dem uberraschenden Besuch des finnischen Prasidenten Urho Kekkonen in Sowjet-Estland im Fruhjahr 1964 kam etwas Licht durch diesen schwarzen Vorhang, was in der Aufnahme eines regelmassigen Fahrverkehrs zwischen Helsinki und Tallinn gipfelte.
Whichever the case, construction of the Soviet image in the Finnish press has been connected to official foreign policy and especially to President Urho Kekkonen during his long term in office (1956-1981).
Part of Urho Kekkonen National Park in the north of Finland.
Finnish President Urho Kekkonen, who died in 1986, called sauna "the great leveler.
An interesting trait of this generation was their predominantly positive attitude towards President Urho Kekkonen.
The Centre Party dominated Finnish politics during the Cold War because it was the party of Urho Kekkonen (1900-1986), who was president from 1956 to 1981.
Evidence of this attitude was present in 1948 when the speaker of the Finnish parliament, Urho Kekkonen (later, president of Finland), spoke out against Kilpinen's candidacy for the Academy of Arts and Sciences, citing the composer's ties to the Germany of the Third Reich.