Usman dan Fodio


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Usman dan Fodio

(ˈuːsmɑːn dæn ˈfəʊdɪəʊ)
n
(Biography) 1754–1817, African mystic and revolutionary leader, who created a Muslim state in Nigeria
References in periodicals archive ?
The daughter of the Nigerian Sokoto Caliphate founder Usman dan Fodio, she devoted her life to educating women both rich and poor, Muslim and non-Muslim.
Such differences in the composition of culture and religion polarised religio-political ideas that resulted in the inception of the Fulani Jihad led by Shaihu Usman Dan Fodio (also spelt as Shehu Uthman Dan Fuduye).
Makers of Nigeria: Usman Dan Fodio, Ibadan, Ibadan University Press Ltd.
While Izala has a rationalizing and egalitarian tenor (so is, to that extent, 'modernist'), it also stands firmly in a tradition of Islamic reform going back locally to Usman dan Fodio, whose jihad in the early nineteenth century established the Sokoto Caliphate and, through it, the prevailing Islamic order in Northern Nigeria.
Where Abodunde's tone is irenical towards other forms of Christianity, since his storyline is of a continuous work of the Spirit which culminates in Pentecostalism, Olayiwola is highly polemical towards all forms of Islam that fall short of the Salafist ideal of 'rightly guided' religious unity: the historically Muslim Hausa kingdoms overthrown by Usman dan Fodio, the Sufi religious orders with their millions of members, Ahmadiyya--all come under the anathema of takfir.
Although there is a brief mention of the jihad launched by Usman dan Fodio, the more ordinary Africans who must have selected (or captured) the slaves for transport to Ghadames are not represented in this work.
46) According to the United Kingdom, Ansaru is "anti-Western" and "broadly aligned" to al-Qa'ida, while in its own words Ansaru says it wants to restore the "dignity of Usman dan Fodio.
Although the ethnic groups in some of these countries differ from northern Nigeria, Boko Haram and Ansaru have the potential to inspire other "Boko Harams" in West Africa with their ideologies that fault the secular government, democracy and the West for their troubles and hark back to a time when Usman dan Fodio and the Islamic caliphate brought "glory" and "dignity" to the Muslims of the region.
In the area that became northern Nigeria and Niger, the jihad was led by a sheikh of the nomadic Fulani tribe, Usman dan Fodio.
Even earlier West Africa was home to a continuous series of reform jihads, the most successful, that of Usman Dan Fodio, which created the Sokoto Caliphate, a state lasting from 1803 to 1903.
It must also be remembered that Usman dan Fodio was not a military leader.
The Sokoto Caliphate grew out of the jihad of Usman dan Fodio and was the political expression of the desire to establish a proper Islamic society in the region of Northern Nigeria.