utilitarianism

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Related to Utilitarian ethics: Kantian ethics, Deontological ethics

u·til·i·tar·i·an·ism

 (yo͞o-tĭl′ĭ-târ′ē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief that the value of a thing or an action is determined by its utility.
2. The ethical theory proposed by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill that all action should be directed toward achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people.
3. The quality of being utilitarian: housing of bleak utilitarianism.

utilitarianism

(juːˌtɪlɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the doctrine that the morally correct course of action consists in the greatest good for the greatest number, that is, in maximizing the total benefit resulting, without regard to the distribution of benefits and burdens
2. (Philosophy) the theory that the criterion of virtue is utility

u•til•i•tar•i•an•ism

(yuˌtɪl ɪˈtɛər i əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the ethical doctrine that virtue is based on utility, and that conduct should be directed toward promoting the greatest happiness of the greatest number of persons.
2. utilitarian quality or character.
[1820–30]

utilitarianism

the ethical doctrine that virtue is based upon utility and that behavior should have as its goal the procurement of the greatest happiness for the greatest number of persons. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Ethics
the philosophical tenets set forth by John Stuart Mill based on the principle of “the greatest good for the greatest number” and holding that the criterion of virtue lies in its utility. — utilitarian, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

utilitarianism

A philosophical school of thought arguing that ethics must be based on whatever brings the greatest amount of good to the greatest number of people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.utilitarianism - doctrine that the useful is the good; especially as elaborated by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill; the aim was said to be the greatest happiness for the greatest number
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

utilitarianism

[ˌjuːtɪlɪˈtɛərɪənɪzəm] Nutilitarismo m

utilitarianism

n (Philos) → Utilitarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
This utilitarian ethics of population medicine was enshrined in the American College of Physicians updated ethics manual in 2012.
Meeting needs, upholding social rights, preserving human life, protecting ecosystems, and promoting human development are underlying principles of an economics geared towards life, yet are external to the utilitarian ethics of the market economy.
Indeed, Schnitzler reinforces them by casting the conflicts between the protagonists in terms of two opposing philosophical stances: the utilitarian ethics of a John Stuart Mill or Herbert Spencer on the one side and Kantian idealism on the other.
Responsible parties at Schick applied utilitarian ethics, but this approach failed to produce moral behavior.
Krantz lo presenta en las primeras paginas de la introduccion a su libro: "In his version of utilitarian ethics, he has drawn conclusions that no sane person will easily accept--a newborn human infant has no more value than a snail".
Drawing on a wide range of sources in philosophical and theological ethics, Lake argues that these writers share a commitment to maintaining a category of personhood more meaningful than that allowed by utilitarian ethics.
If the winners exceed the losers, or if the result is what economists would call a positive-sum game, a utilitarian would conclude that the practice is ethical, a result that is surprising for someone who is not versed in utilitarian ethics.
Contrary to personalistic ethics where human life-also a poor-quality one-is of the highest value, utilitarian ethics tries to connect the value of human life with its quality, arguing that a poor-quality life may be wrongful for a patient, so he or she should have the right to euthanasia or supported suicide.
Philosophers and psychologists have long argued about whether there is one "right" answer to such moral questions, be it utilitarian ethics, which advocates saving as many as possible, even if it requires personally harming an individual, or non-utilitarian principles, which mandate strict adherence to rules like "don't kill" that are rooted in the value of human life and dignity.
Combining utilitarian ethics with arts education is, however, an area where more work can be undertaken.
Harris's utilitarian ethics entails altruism, because in order to advance the greatest happiness for others, an individual must sacrifice his own values.
On the other hand, Jeremy Bentham's utilitarian ethics suggest that collateral damage is morally acceptable, provided that the attack prevents the enemy from killing still more innocents.