V-chip

(redirected from V-chips)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

V-chip

(vē′chĭp′)
n.
A microchip installed in a television to allow the user to control the display of certain programs, especially of sexual or violent content.

V-chip

n
(Broadcasting) a device within a television set that allows the set to be programmed not to receive transmissions that have been classified as containing sex, violence, or obscene language

V-chip

(ˈviˌtʃɪp)
n.
a computer chip or other electronic device that blocks the reception of violent or sexually explicit television shows.
[1990–95; v (iolent) or v (iolence) + chip (definition 5)]
Translations

V-chip

nV-Chip m
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Or why did the 1996 Telecommunications Act usher in a requirement that V-chips be implanted in all post-2000 TV sets so that parents could limit or control their children's viewing of "violent" programs?
Persistent second-guessing of v-chips and cinema ratings lapses into a limp conclusion that children should learn critical thinking.
Electronic devices or so-called V-chips for television in homes, while perhaps effective with very young children, are also of limited value, especially if used without parental interaction.
The author argues that because electronics are now outfitted with V-chips, Internet filters, and parental controls, consumers can now adjust their viewing and listening patterns to suit their own values and morals.
James Potter analyzes rating systems, family viewing hours, V-chips (child protection devices), and so forth and argues that these are of little help.
And then there's a bit where some Parents Television Council says it's a jungle out there and we should install V-chips directly into the cerebral cortex of every American.
Penn who helped shape the 1996 Bill Clinton campaign in which "soccer moms" were identified and wooed with such Cracker Jack prizes as school uniforms and V-chips to monitor TV violence.
Jack Valenti can discuss V-chips, public-service ads and parental responsibility till the cows come home, but just as academics keep studying media's influence, politicians, too, will keep returning to this PR-friendly "family values" crusade like swallows to Capistrano.
Through their entire childhood, they have witnessed rising concern over movie and TV ratings, zero tolerance in the classroom, V-chips, urban curfews, and other family mechanisms to protect the children.
However, with approximately 250,000 v-chips already installed throughout Canada, they are clearly the wave of the future.
But nonetheless, the fact of the matter is that Clinton ran in '96 on little more than school uniforms and so-called V-chips for television sets.