Valentinianism


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Valentinianism

a 2nd-century blending of Egyptian Gnosticism and Christi-anity into a system of heretical doctrines, especially the denial that Christ took his human nature from the Virgin Mary. Cf. Gnosticism. — Valentinian, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
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Pamphilus records that Origen is accused for using homoousios to refer to Christ's relationship with the Father (rightly so, according to Edwards), an accusation which implies Valentinianism in the third century, but becomes the litmus test of orthodoxy in the fourth.
He also draws on materials associated with the eastern Valentinian Theodotus in order to distinguish the more primitive Christology, soteriology, and protology of eastern Valentinianism from the more elaborate theories of the western systems.
As with Valentinianism, with whose abstractions it has much in common, it is difficult to summarise its tenets.
Hengel, is presented as the first part of the author's extended study of Valentinianism.
Scholars usually attempt to harmonize the differences between the fragments and the heresiological accounts of Valentinianism, suggesting, e.
2 has no parallel on an early dating and is specifically anti-Valentinian and that the "Star Hymn" in chapter 19 can be interpreted only on the basis of Valentinianism (Lechner suggests it is a parody of the Valentinian myth of the birth of the Redeemer in the Pleroma).
4, lesson 2, Thomas unpacks deep christological significance out of this one phrase arguing that it excludes both Nestorianism and Valentinianism as well as shows that Mary is the Mother of God.
On the contrary, Michel Desjardins has written an entire monograph on Sin in Valentinianism (Scholars Press, 1990), and Malcolm Peel summarizes the teaching of The Treatise on the Resurrection, as follows: "[T]his `resurrection body,' covered with a new `flesh' or `garment of light', retains personally identifiable features.