Valentinianism


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Valentinianism

a 2nd-century blending of Egyptian Gnosticism and Christi-anity into a system of heretical doctrines, especially the denial that Christ took his human nature from the Virgin Mary. Cf. Gnosticism. — Valentinian, n., adj.
See also: Heresy
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Pamphilus records that Origen is accused for using homoousios to refer to Christ's relationship with the Father (rightly so, according to Edwards), an accusation which implies Valentinianism in the third century, but becomes the litmus test of orthodoxy in the fourth.
He also draws on materials associated with the eastern Valentinian Theodotus in order to distinguish the more primitive Christology, soteriology, and protology of eastern Valentinianism from the more elaborate theories of the western systems.
As with Valentinianism, with whose abstractions it has much in common, it is difficult to summarise its tenets.
For example, instead of directly comparing Tatian's Oration with Valentinianism, she chooses instead to argue against the conclusions of R.
Here one must query the use of the word `spirit' to translate [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in a passage from Hippolytus relating to Valentinianism (p.
Hengel, is presented as the first part of the author's extended study of Valentinianism.
For example, in Valentinianism, Jesus Christ was considered as God's Emissary, while in Sethianism it was Seth.
2 has no parallel on an early dating and is specifically anti-Valentinian and that the "Star Hymn" in chapter 19 can be interpreted only on the basis of Valentinianism (Lechner suggests it is a parody of the Valentinian myth of the birth of the Redeemer in the Pleroma).
4, lesson 2, Thomas unpacks deep christological significance out of this one phrase arguing that it excludes both Nestorianism and Valentinianism as well as shows that Mary is the Mother of God.
A further point relates to the development of the Gnostic systems: on the one hand it was claimed that Valentinus and his school had developed and further Christianized the older vulgar gnosis represented by AJ; on the other there were those who interpreted the statements of Irenaeus to mean that this vulgar gnosis itself derived from Valentinianism.
On the contrary, Michel Desjardins has written an entire monograph on Sin in Valentinianism (Scholars Press, 1990), and Malcolm Peel summarizes the teaching of The Treatise on the Resurrection, as follows: "[T]his `resurrection body,' covered with a new `flesh' or `garment of light', retains personally identifiable features.
Thus the use of female metaphors in God-language may bear some superficial resemblance to Valentinianism, but few, if any, contemporary feminist theologians would be interested in affirming a metaphysic that decried the 'material'.