validity

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val·id

 (văl′ĭd)
adj.
1. Well grounded; just: a valid objection.
2. Producing the desired results; efficacious: valid methods.
3. Having legal force; effective or binding: a valid title.
4. Logic
a. Containing premises from which the conclusion may logically be derived: a valid argument.
b. Correctly inferred or deduced from a premise: a valid conclusion.
5. Archaic Of sound health; robust.

[French valide, from Old French, from Latin validus, strong, from valēre, to be strong; see wal- in Indo-European roots.]

va·lid′i·ty, val′id·ness n.
val′id·ly adv.
Synonyms: valid, sound2, cogent, convincing
These adjectives describe assertions, arguments, conclusions, reasons, or intellectual processes that are persuasive because they are well founded. What is valid is based on or borne out by truth or fact or has legal force: a valid excuse; a valid claim.
What is sound is free from logical flaws or is based on valid reasoning: a sound theory; sound principles.
Something cogent is both sound and compelling: cogent testimony; a cogent explanation.
Convincing implies the power to dispel doubt or overcome resistance or opposition: convincing proof.

va•lid•i•ty

(vəˈlɪd ɪ ti)

n.
1. the state or quality of being valid.
2. legal soundness or force.
[1540–50; < Late Latin]

Validity

 

hold water To be valid, sound, and defensible; to show no inconsistency or deficiency when put to the test. As early as the beginning of the 17th century, this expression was used figuratively of arguments, statements, etc., although both hold and water can be taken literally to describe a vessel or other receptacle’s soundness in retaining a liquid.

Let them produce a more rational account of any other opinion, that will hold water … better than this mine doth. (John French, The York-shire Spaw, 1652)

a leg to stand on Viable proof or justification; something on which to base one’s claims or attitudes. A leg pro vides support and helps to maintain balance. Figuratively this expression is most often heard in the negative not have a leg to stand on, referring to one who fails to support his attitudes or behavior. It is frequently used in legal contexts where an inability to provide proof or justification is pronounced. The still current expression dates from the 16th century.

She hasn’t a leg to stand on in the case. He’s divorcing her, she’s not divorcing him. (M. Spark, Bachelors, 1960)

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.validity - the quality of being valid and rigorous
believability, credibility, credibleness - the quality of being believable or trustworthy
2.validity - the quality of having legal force or effectiveness
legality - lawfulness by virtue of conformity to a legal statute
effect, force - (of a law) having legal validity; "the law is still in effect"
3.validity - the property of being strong and healthy in constitution
strength - the property of being physically or mentally strong; "fatigue sapped his strength"

validity

noun
1. soundness, force, power, grounds, weight, strength, foundation, substance, point, cogency Some people deny the validity of this claim.
2. legality, authority, legitimacy, right, lawfulness They now want to challenge the validity of the vote.

validity

noun
The quality of being authentic:
Translations
Validität
kelpoisuusvaliditeetti
veljavnost

validity

[vəˈlɪdɪtɪ] N (all senses) → validez f

validity

[vəˈlɪdəti væˈlɪdəti] n
[contract, document] → validité f
[claim, results, method, argument] → validité f

validity

n
(Jur etc: of document) → (Rechts)gültigkeit f; (of ticket etc)Gültigkeit f; (of claim)Berechtigung f
(of argument)Stichhaltigkeit f; (of excuse etc)Triftigkeit f; the validity of your objectionIhr berechtigter or begründeter Einwand; we discussed the validity of merging these two cinematic styleswir diskutierten, ob es zulässig ist, diese beiden Filmstile zu mischen

validity

[vəˈlɪdɪtɪ] n (of document) → validità; (of argument) → fondatezza, validità

va·lid·i·ty

n. validez.

validity

n validez f
References in classic literature ?
The case at present must remain inexplicable; and may be truly urged as a valid argument against the views here entertained.
May I suggest that the RNIB visit the area and see that what I am writing is a valid argument for the safety of sighted and non-sighted residents of Clive Road.
The Reagan Doctrine gets much of the credit for the death of the Soviet empire, but we think Larry Hagman made a valid argument when he said the TV show "Dallas" played a role.
A very valid argument could be made of the most important person this year being the manager, but my outstanding players on the pitch, in reverse order, are below.
While there exists a valid argument for providing a specific environment for special needs children with severe learning disabilities, in the form of special needs centres, there are also a large number of children with mild learning disabilities who would benefit immensely by adapting to a mainstream school, but are unable to gain entry because mainstream schools are still wary of making the transition to a more inclusive platform.
We have to get our evidence right to make a valid argument, as teachers and students know well, thanks to more rigorous Common Core standards.
For a General Election this is a valid argument, but for a local and European election it is total nonsense.
There is a valid argument that this season's cup run has been even more impressive for Wigan given Rosler, only appointed in December, has propelled his team into the play-offs in spite of a crowded fixture list which included six Europa League games.
The defense debate in Europe is one of Severe Valid Argument Failure (SVAF), one of the worst diseases that can befall any political discourse.
There is a valid argument, however, that social media networks such as LinkedIn and Twitter can be used for constructive purposes and career advancement.
On the face of it, this seems a perfectly valid argument.
The claim that the current [euro]160 licence fee is below the European standard is not a valid argument for a rise.