variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease


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variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

n
(Pathology) another name for new-variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Constant transmission properties of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 5 countries.
Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease is the human equivalent of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), which affects cattle.
Tissues have transmitted prions, and the prion that causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has almost certainly been transmitted by blood transfusion.
The patient received a blood transfusion in 1999 from a donor who later went on to develop variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the human form of socalled 'mad cow disease'.
Humans who eat beef from cattle with BSE may develop a similar illness called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), which is untreatable and always fatal.
com recently reported that officials with the European Food Safety Authority's (EFSA) panel on biological hazards has concluded that category 1 animal byproducts -- those that could potentially spread such diseases as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as "mad cow disease," and its variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) -- can be safely processed into biodiesel fuel.
In 1996, scientists concluded they'd discovered a human version of BSE, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD).
A human illness, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is related to mad cow disease, and doctors believe humans contract it from eating meat containing infected tissue.
The disease manifested in humans is called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), because it closely resembles the prion disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (Narang, 2001).
The collection will be used to estimate how many people in the UK may be carrying variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) - the killer brain disease.
The appearance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow") disease in the United Kingdom in the 1990s and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans had major health, political, and economic impacts (Newcomb 2003).
A Saskatchewan man has become Canada's first victim of the human version of mad cow disease, but the patient probably contracted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in Britain rather than in North America, Health Canada officials said.