Varro


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Related to Varro: Spartacus, Cicero

Var·ro

 (văr′ō), Marcus Terentius 116-27 bc.
Roman scholar and encyclopedist who reputedly produced more than 600 volumes, covering nearly every field of knowledge.

Varro

(ˈværəʊ)
n
(Biography) Marcus Terentius (ˈmɑːkəs təˈrɛntɪəs). 116–27 bc, Roman scholar and satirist
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Noun1.Varro - Roman scholar (116-27 BC)Varro - Roman scholar (116-27 BC)    
References in classic literature ?
Cato says that the profits of agriculture are particularly pious or just (maximeque pius quaestus), and according to Varro the old Romans "called the same earth Mother and Ceres, and thought that they who cultivated it led a pious and useful life, and that they alone were left of the race of King Saturn.
The word is from the Latin villa which together with via, a way, or more anciently ved and vella, Varro derives from veho, to carry, because the villa is the place to and from which things are carried.
Rasheed F, Campbell BJ, Alfizah H, Varro A, Zahra R, Yamaoka Y, et al.
Competitiveness very much depends on the utilization of the car," Laszlo Varro, chief economist at the International Energy Agency, said in an interview.
What does it do: Walnut was known to the Romans as 'Nux' and mentioned by Pliny and Varro as being cultivated in Italy before the advent of the 1st millenia.
Farming practices continue to disturb habitats and the honey bee is also under attack from the Varro mite.
The Baltic Times talked to Varro Vooglaid, the chair of SAPTK and spokesperson of the campaign to holding referendums.
Synopsis: Some six years after his narrow escape from proscription in 43 BCE, Marcus Terentius Varro, the "most learned" of the Romans, wrote a technical treatise on farming in the form of a satirico-philosophical dialogue.
Electricity is increasing its share in total energy consumption and coal is increasing its share in power generation," said Laszlo Varro, head of the gas, coal and power markets division for the International Energy Agency (IEA).
Marcus Terentius Varro (116-27 BC), for example, tells of training young pigs to respond to a horn call.
Similarly, Guilandinus emended both the Vulgate and Septuagint in virtue of his own discoveries in natural philosophy; and he and his colleagues contended with ancient pagan authorities on natural philosophy like Pliny and Varro with appeals to the biblical text as an authoritative account for certain aspects of natural history.