Veda


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Related to Veda: Upanishads, Rigveda, Atharva Veda

Ve·da

 (vā′də, vē′-)
n.
1. The oldest and most authoritative body of sacred Hindu texts, composed in Sanskrit and gathered into four collections.
2. Any of these collections.

[Sanskrit vedaḥ, sacred lore, knowledge, Veda; see weid- in Indo-European roots.]

Veda

(ˈveɪdə)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) any or all of the most ancient sacred writings of Hinduism, esp the Rig-Veda, Yajur-Veda, Sama-Veda, and Atharva-Veda
[C18: from Sanskrit: knowledge; related to veda I know]
Vedaic adj
Vedaism n

Ve•da

(ˈveɪ də, ˈvi-)

n., pl. -das.
1. Sometimes, Vedas. the sacred scriptures of Hinduism, esp. as comprising the hymns and formulas in the Rig-Veda, the Sama-Veda, the Atharva-Veda, and the Yajur-Veda.
2. Also called Samhita. any of these individual writings.
[< Skt]
Ve•da•ic (vɪˈdeɪ ɪk) adj.
Ve′da•ism, n.

Veda

The oldest Hindu writings, dating from c. 1000 BC incorporated in four collections.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Veda - (from the Sanskrit word for `knowledge') any of the most ancient sacred writings of Hinduism written in early SanskritVeda - (from the Sanskrit word for `knowledge') any of the most ancient sacred writings of Hinduism written in early Sanskrit; traditionally believed to comprise the Samhitas, the Brahmanas, the Aranyakas, and the Upanishads
Hindooism, Hinduism - a body of religious and philosophical beliefs and cultural practices native to India and based on a caste system; it is characterized by a belief in reincarnation, by a belief in a supreme being of many forms and natures, by the view that opposing theories are aspects of one eternal truth, and by a desire for liberation from earthly evils
religious text, religious writing, sacred text, sacred writing - writing that is venerated for the worship of a deity
Sanskrit, Sanskritic language - (Hinduism) an ancient language of India (the language of the Vedas and of Hinduism); an official language of India although it is now used only for religious purposes
Translations

Veda

[ˈveɪdə] NVeda m

Veda

nWeda m
References in classic literature ?
When Brahma, or the God of Gods, saith the Shaster, resolved to recreate the world after one of its periodical dissolutions, he gave birth to Vishnoo, to preside over the work; but the Vedas, or mystical books, whose perusal would seem to have been indispensable to Vishnoo before beginning the creation, and which therefore must have contained something in the shape of practical hints to young architects, these Vedas were lying at the bottom of the waters; so Vishnoo became incarnate in a whale, and sounding down in him to the uttermost depths, rescued the sacred volumes.
The hydra of the Romancero and some other hybrid forms, the Vedas and the Nibelungen bristle further on.
The Vedas say, "All intelligences awake with the morning.
The film does indeed emphasize the physical similarity of Veda and Mildred, so much so that, in several scenes, the two women dress and wear their hair so similarly that at first glance it may be difficult to distinguish between them.
Veda and Gus met at Salvation Army meetings in Greendale and were married for 74 years.
Timebankers have also taken Veda to events and enabled her to take part in an art competition.
We were only a young courting couple and working in Liverpool when we sawit last," said Veda who runs a B&B in Llangollen and is a long-time supporter of the International Eisteddfod.
The Vedas inform us that one of the highest 'universal laws is Pitri Rina, repaying .
That's right, for the next year you could be sitting by the fire and tucking into a delicious slice of toasted Sunblest Veda FREE - thanks to our latest tasty competition.
Were she only an opera singer, like Madame Modjeska in Willa Cather's My Mortal Enemy, an angel from the higher realms, the book would collapse into kitsch, but this is a book about a bakery, after all, so Veda achieves fame and money singing on the radio for Sunbake vitamin bread.
Lou Pietroluongo, of the New York State Insurance Department, read from the Krishna Yajur Veda during the service.
These include the Soma sacrifice in the Rig Veda, the manna given to the Israelites during their forty years in the wilderness, the Zoroastrian drink of immortality, the well-known Christian communion rite, the story in the Mahabharata of Krishna dispelling the hunger of Durvasa and his 10,000 disciples (Rajagopalachari, 1990), and Jesus feeding the multitude of 5,000 people in the Christian gospels.