venial sin

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Related to Venial sins: Mortal sins

venial sin

n. Roman Catholic Church
An offense that is judged to be minor or committed without deliberate intent and thus does not estrange the soul from the grace of God.

venial sin

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a sin regarded as involving only a partial loss of grace. Compare mortal sin

ve′nial sin′


n.
Rom. Cath. Ch.
a sin that does not deprive the soul of divine grace either because it is a minor offense or because it was committed without full consent or understanding of its seriousness. Compare mortal sin.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.venial sin - a pardonable sin regarded as entailing only a partial loss of grace
sinning, sin - an act that is regarded by theologians as a transgression of God's will
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"
References in classic literature ?
A venial sin, for you acted without evil intention.
There are more revelations in and about Lucifer than our daily commission of venial sins.
It is enough to confess venial sins to get the necessary absolution from the confessor.
Yet, the Supreme Court, or nine of the injustices, considered these venial sins, and of course, President Du30 says that there is no law that prohibits the burial of Marcos in the Libingan.
Also absent is discussion of the widespread decline of the sacrament of reconciliation, the blurring of the difference between mortal and venial sins, and the practice of prayer for the souls in purgatory.
The book is well-written, the historical details are entertaining, and the reader is ready to forgive many of the author's venial sins.
Venial sins are commonly divided into faults of surprise and deliberate sins.
GOSSIP IS THE LATEST IN JOSEPH EPSTEIN'S send-ups of America's venial sins, coming after Ambition (1980), Snobbery (2002), and Envy (2003).
We equate both grievous and venial sins with ugliness.
Denouncing Luther's characteristic teaching that Christians are "simultaneously justified and sinners," Marpeck held that the regenerate are free from sin--Rempel insists that Marpeck means that regenerate Christians are free from major sins, suggesting something like the traditional Catholic distinction between mortal and venial sins.
For example, one lost a "special increase of sanctifying grace" or "the precious opportunity of having all your venial sins wiped away" or even "deliverance of a relative or friend from purgatory.